Etymology
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entrance (n.)

1520s, "act of entering," from French entrance, from entrer (see enter). Sense of "door, gate" first recorded in English 1530s. Meaning "a coming of an actor upon the stage" is from c. 1600.

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entrance (v.)

"to throw into a trance," 1590s, from en- (1) "put in" + trance (n.). Meaning "to delight" also is 1590s. Related: Entranced; entrancing; entrancement.

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exam (n.)

college student slang shortened form of examination, 1848.

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coaching (n.)

1825, "the use of a coach as a public conveyance;" 1849 as "special instruction or training for an exam or an athletic contest;" verbal noun from coach (v.). 

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coach (v.)

1610s, "to convey in a coach," from coach (n.). Meaning "to tutor, give private instruction to, prepare (someone) for an exam or a contest" is from 1849. Related: Coached; coaching.

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Abitur (n.)

German final secondary school exam, 1863, short for abiturium, from Modern Latin abitorire "to wish to leave," desiderative of Latin abire (neuter plural abitum) "to go away," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").

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adit (n.)

"entrance," especially "horizontal mine excavation," c. 1600, from Latin aditus "an approach, an entrance; a going to or drawing near," from past participle stem of adire "to approach," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ire (past participle itus) "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").

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hellgate (n.)

also Hell-gate, "the entrance to Hell," Old English hellegat; see hell + gate (n.).

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gateway (n.)

"passage, entrance," 1707, from gate (n.) + way (n.). Figurative use from 1842.

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doorway (n.)

"the passage of a door, an entrance into a room or building," 1738, from door + way (n.).

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