Etymology
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ensnare (v.)

formerly also insnare, 1570s, from en- (1) "make, put in" + snare (n.). Related: Ensnared; ensnaring.

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snare (v.)

late 14c., "to ensnare," from snare (n.1). Related: Snared; snaring.

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ketch (n.)

kind of small, strong, two-masted sailing vessel, 1650s, earlier catch (mid-15c.), cache (late 14c.), probably from Middle English cacchen "to capture, ensnare, chase" (see catch (v.)). Compare the sense development in yacht.

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lash (v.2)

"to tie or bind," as with rope or cord, 1620s, originally nautical, from French lachier, from Old French lacier "to lace on, fasten with laces; entrap, ensnare" (see lace (v.)). Related: Lashed; lashing.

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trap (v.)

late 14c., "ensnare (an animal), catch in a trap; encircle; capture," from trap (n.) or from Old English betræppan. Figurative use is slightly earlier (late 14c.). Related: Trapped; trapping.

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enlace (v.)

late 14c., "connect, involve, entangle," from Old French enlacer "trap, ensnare, capture," from Late Latin *inlaciare, from in- (from PIE root *en "in") + *lacius, from Latin laqueus "noose" (see lace (n.)). Related: Enlaced; enlacing.

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deceive (v.)

"mislead by false appearance or statement," c. 1300, from Old French decevoir "to deceive" (12c., Modern French décevoir), from Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de "from" or pejorative (see de-) + combining form of capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Deceived; deceiver; deceiving.

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deception (n.)

early 15c., decepcioun, "act of misleading, a lie, a falsehood," from Old French déception (13c., decepcion) or directly from Late Latin deceptionem (nominative deceptio) "a deceiving," noun of state or action from past-participle stem of Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de "from" or pejorative (see de-) + capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp."

From mid-15c. as "state of being deceived; error, mistake;" from 1794 as "artifice, cheat, that which deceives."

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deceptive (adj.)

"tending to mislead or give false impression," 1610s, from French deceptif (late 14c.), from Medieval Latin deceptivus, from decept-, past participle stem of Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de "from" or pejorative (see de-) + capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp."

In this sense in English it superseded deceptious (c. 1600), from French deceptieux, from Medieval Latin deceptiosus, from deceptionem; also deceptory (mid-15c.), from Latin deceptorious. Related: Deceptively; deceptiveness.

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intrigue (v.)

1610s, "to trick, deceive, cheat," from French intriguer (16c.), from Italian intrigare "to plot, meddle; perplex, puzzle," from Latin intricare "to entangle, perplex, embarrass" (see intricate).

Meaning "to plot or scheme" is recorded by 1714. That of "to excite curiosity" is from 1894 (OED calls this use "A modern gallicism"). It also could mean "carry on a clandestine or illicit sexual relationship" (1650s). The word appears earlier in English as entriken "entangle, ensnare; involve in perplexity, embarrass" (late 14c.), from Old French entrique or directly from the Latin verb. Related: Intrigued; intriguer; intriguing. Dutch intrigueren, German intriguiren are from French.

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