Etymology
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engrave (v.)

"to cut in, make by incision, produce or form by incision on a hard surface," mid-15c. (implied in ingraved "engraved"), from en- (1) + obsolete verb grave "carve" (see grave (v.)) or from or modeled on French engraver. Related: Engraved; engraven; engraving.

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ingrave (v.)
see engrave. Related: Ingraved; ingraving.
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engraving (n.)
c. 1600, "act of cutting designs, etc. on a hard surface," verbal noun from engrave (v.). Meaning "that which is engraved" is from 1610s; meaning "impression taken from an engraved plate" is from 1803.
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engraver (n.)

"one who produces ornaments, patterns, or representations by means of incisions on a hard surface," especially an artist who produces such designs to be used for the taking of impressions in printers ink or other pigment, 1580s, agent noun from engrave.

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grave (v.)
"to engrave," Old English grafan "to dig, dig up; engrave, carve, chisel" (medial -f- pronounced as "v" in Old English; past tense grof, past participle grafen), from Proto-Germanic *grabanan (source also of Old Norse grafa "to dig; engrave; inquire into," Old Frisian greva, Dutch graven "to dig, delve," Old High German graban, German graben, Gothic graban "to dig, carve"), from the same source as grave (n.). Its Middle English strong past participle, graven, is the only part still active, the rest of the word supplanted by its derivative, engrave.
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intaglio (n.)
"incised engraving" (as opposed to carving in relief), 1640s, from Italian intaglio "engraved work" (plural intagli), from intagliare "to cut in, engrave," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + tagliare "to cut," from Late Latin taliare "to split" (see tailor (n.)).
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hatch (v.2)
"engrave, draw fine parallel lines," late 14c., from Old French hachier "chop up, hack" (14c.), from hache "ax" (see hatchet). Related: Hatched; hatching. The noun meaning "an engraved line or stroke" is from 1650s.
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sculpture (n.)
late 14c., from Latin sculptura "sculpture," from past participle stem of sculpere "to carve, engrave," back-formation from compounds such as exculpere, from scalpere "to carve, cut," from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut."
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glyph (n.)

1727, "ornamental groove in sculpture or architecture," from French glyphe (1701), from Greek glyphē "a carving," from glyphein "to hollow out, cut out with a knife, engrave, carve," also "to note down" on tablets, from PIE root *gleubh- "to cut, slice, tear apart." Meaning "sculpted mark or symbol" (as in hieroglyph) is from 1825. Related: Glyphic.

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glyptodon (n.)

extinct gigantic armadillo-like mammal from the Pleistocene of South America, 1838, irregularly formed from Greek glyptos "carved, engraved" (verbal adjective of glyphein "to engrave, carve;" from PIE root *gleubh- "to tear apart, cleave") + odon (genitive odontos) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth"). So named for its fluted teeth.

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