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England (n.)
Old English Engla land, literally "the land of the Angles" (see English (n.1)), used alongside Angelcynn "the English race," which, with other forms, shows Anglo-Saxon persistence in thinking in terms of tribes rather than place. By late Old English times both words had come to be used with a clear sense of place, not people; a Dane, Canute, is first to call himself "King of England." By the 14c. the name was being used in reference to the entire island of Great Britain and to the land of the Celtic Britons before the Anglo-Saxon conquest. The loss of one of the duplicate syllables is a case of haplology.
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New England 

1616, named by Capt. John Smith. As an adjective, New English (1630s) is older than New Englandish (1863). Related: New Englander; the Latinized form Novanglian is attested from 1670s.

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Anglo-Norman (adj.)
1767, "pertaining to the Normans who settled in England," from Anglo- + Norman. As a noun, 1735; from 1801 as "the Norman dialect of Old French as spoken and developed in England."
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Anglican (adj.)
1630s, "high-church, of the Church of England," from Medieval Latin Anglicanus, from Anglicus "of the English people, of England," from Angli "the Angles" (see Angle). The noun meaning "adherent of the Church of England" is first recorded 1797. Related: Anglicanism.
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Wessex 
Anglo-Saxon kingdom in southern England, literally "(land of the) West Saxons;" see west + Saxon. Modern use in reference to southwestern England (excluding Cornwall) is from Hardy's novels.
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nae 
northern England and Scottish variant of no.
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Anglo- 
word-forming element meaning "of or pertaining to England or the English (including the English inhabitants of North America and other places); of England and," from Medieval Latin Anglo-, combining form of Angli "the English" (see Angle).
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Cape Cod 
peninsula of New England, named 1602 by English navigator Bartholomew Gosnold for the abundance of fish his men caught there (see cod). In reference to houses reminiscent of New England architecture, from 1916.
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Anglicism (n.)
1640s, "anglicized language, that which is peculiar to England in speech or writing," from Latin Anglicus "of the English" (see Angle) + -ism. As an instance of this, "a word or expression used particularly in England and not in America," from 1781.
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succotash (n.)
1751, from a word in a Southern New England Algonquian language, such as Narragansett misckquatash "boiled whole kernels of corn." Used by 1793 in New England in reference to a dish of boiled corn and green beans (especially lima beans).
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