Etymology
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encouragement (n.)

1560s, from encourage + -ment, or from French encoragement.

As a general rule, Providence seldom vouchsafes to mortals any more than just that degree of encouragement which suffices to keep them at a reasonably full exertion of their powers. [Hawthorne, "House of Seven Gables"]
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excitement (n.)

early 15c., "encouragement;" c. 1600, "something that tends to excite," from excite + -ment. Meaning "condition of mental and emotional agitation" is from 1846.

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huzza (interj.)

also huzzah, 1570s, originally a sailor's shout of exaltation, encouragement, or applause. Perhaps originally a hoisting cry. As a verb from 1680s.

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cheers (interj.)

salute or toast when taking a drink, British, 1919, from plural of cheer (also see cheerio). Earlier it is recorded as a shout of support or encouragement (1720).

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hortative (adj.)

"encouraging, inciting," 1620s, from Latin hortativus "that serves for encouragement," from hortat-, past participle stem of hortari "to exhort, urge, incite," from PIE root *gher- (2) "to like, want."

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attaboy (interj.)

1909, originally in baseball slang, said to be from common pronunciation of "that's the boy!" a cheer of encouragement or approval. I'm the boy for ______ "I'm willing and capable at" is attested from 1843. Related: Attagirl (1924).

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refreshment (n.)

late 14c., "provision, provisioning; aid, encouragement; act or fact of refreshing; that which refreshes," originally mental and spiritual, from Old French refreschement (Modern French rafraîchissement), from refreschier "refresh, renew" (see refresh (v.)). Sense of "state of being refreshed" is by late 15c. Refreshments, of food and drink only, is by 1660s.

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hector (v.)

"to bluster, bully, domineer," 1650s, from slang hector (n.) "a blustering, turbulent, pervicacious, noisy fellow" [Johnson], 1650s, from Hector of the "Iliad," in reference to his encouragement of his fellow Trojans to keep up the fight. Earlier in English the name was used generically for "a valiant warrior" (late 14c.). Related: Hectored; hectoring.

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pat (n.)

c. 1400, "a blow, stroke," perhaps originally imitative of the sound. Meaning "light tap with hand" is from c. 1804. Sense of "that which is formed by patting" (as in pat of butter) is 1754, probably from the verb. Pat on the back in the figurative sense "gesture or expression of encouragement, sympathy, etc." is attested by 1804.

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promotion (n.)

c. 1400, promocioun, "advancement in rank, honor, or position," from Old French promocion "election, promotion" (14c., Modern French promotion) and directly from Latin promotionem (nominative promotio) "advancement, a moving forward," noun of action from past-participle stem of promovere "move forward, advance" (see promote).

From early 15c. as "advancement of a cause; assistance, help, support, encouragement." The meaning "advertising, publicity" first recorded 1925.

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