Etymology
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encounter (v.)

c. 1300, "to meet as an adversary," from Old French encontrer "meet, come across; confront, fight, oppose," from encontre "a meeting; a fight; opportunity" (12c.), noun use of preposition/adverb encontre "against, counter to" from Late Latin incontra "in front of," from Latin in-"in" (from PIE root *en "in") + contra "against" (see contra). Weakened sense of "meet casually or unexpectedly" first recorded in English early 16c. Related: Encountered; encountering.

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encounter (n.)

c. 1300, "meeting of adversaries, confrontation," from Old French encontre "meeting; fight; opportunity" (12c.), noun use of preposition/adverb encontre "against, counter to" from Late Latin incontra "in front of," from Latin in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + contra "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)). Modern use of the word in psychology is from 1967, from the work of U.S. psychologist Carl Rogers. Encounter group attested from 1967.

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counter (v.)

"go against, come against, engage in combat," late 14c., short for acountren, encountren (see encounter (v.)). In boxing, "to give a return blow while receiving or parrying a blow from one's opponent," by 1861. Related: Countered; countering.

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brush (n.3)
"a skirmish, a light encounter," c. 1400, probably from brush (v.2).
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intrigue (n.)
1640s, "a clandestine plot;" 1660s, "secret plotting," probably from intrigue (v.). Also used from 1660s as "clandestine or illicit sexual encounter."
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seaworthy (adj.)
1807, "in fit condition to encounter heavy weather at sea," from sea + worthy. Related: Seaworthiness. Old English had særof "hardy at sea."
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clash (n.)
1510s, "sharp, loud noise of collision," from clash (v.). Especially of the noise of conflicting metal weapons. Meaning "hostile encounter" is from 1640s; meaning "conflict of opinions, etc." is from 1781.
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scrap (n.2)
"fight," 1846, possibly a variant of scrape (n.1) on the notion of "an abrasive encounter." Weekley and OED suggest obsolete colloquial scrap "scheme, villainy, vile intention" (1670s).
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obviation (n.)

c. 1400, obviacioun "encounter, contact; exposure," from Medieval Latin obviationem (nominative obviatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of obviare "act contrary to, go against" (see obviate).

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interpersonal (adj.)
1911 (OED finds an isolated use from 1842), from inter- "between" + person (n.) + -al. Introduced in psychology (1938) by H.S. Sullivan (1892-1949) to describe behavior between people in an encounter. Related: Interpersonally.
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