Etymology
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enclosure (n.)
mid-15c., "action of enclosing," from enclose + -ure. Meaning "that which is enclosed" is from 1550s.
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inclosure (n.)
variant of enclosure preserved in some legal uses. Related: Inclosure.
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kraal (n.)
"village, pen, enclosure," 1731, South African, from colonial Dutch kraal, from Portuguese curral "pen or enclosure for animals" (see corral (n.)).
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courtyard (n.)

"enclosure around or adjacent to a house," 1550s, from court (n.) + yard (n.1).

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casing (n.)
1570s, "action of fitting with a case," verbal noun from case (v.). Meaning "a covering, an enclosure" is from 1839.
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haw (n.)
"enclosure," Old English haga "enclosure, fortified enclosure; hedge," from Proto-Germanic *hag- (source also of Old Norse hagi, Old Saxon hago, German Hag "hedge;" Middle Dutch hage, Dutch haag, as in the city name The Hague), from PIE root *kagh- "to catch seize; wickerwork fence" (see hedge (n.), and compare hag). Meaning "fruit of the hawthorn bush" (Old English) is perhaps short for *hægberie.
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paddock (n.2)

"a small field or enclosure," 1620s, apparently an alteration of Middle English parrock, from Old English pearroc "enclosed space, fence" (see park (n.)). Or possibly from Medieval Latin parricus (8c.), which ultimately is from Germanic. Especially a small pastured enclosure near a stable.

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play-pen (n.)

also playpen, "enclosure in which a young child may play," 1916, from play + pen (n.2).

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bird-cage (n.)
also birdcage, "portable enclosure for birds," late 15c., from bird (n.1) + cage (n.).
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fold (n.1)
"pen or enclosure for sheep or other domestic animals," Old English falæd, falud "stall, stable, cattle-pen," a general Germanic word (cognates: East Frisian folt "enclosure, dunghill," Dutch vaalt "dunghill," Danish fold "pen for sheep"), of uncertain origin. Figurative use by mid-14c.
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