Etymology
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emit (v.)

"to send forth, throw or give out," 1620s, from Latin emittere "send forth," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Emitted; emitting.

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emissary (n.)

"person sent on a mission," 1620s, from French émissaire (17c.) or directly from Latin emissarius "a scout, a spy," literally "that is sent out," from emissus, past participle of emittere "send forth" (see emit).

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emission (n.)

early 15c., "something sent forth," from Old French émission (14c.) and directly from Latin emissionem (nominative emissio) "a sending out, a projecting, hurling, letting go, releasing," noun of action from past participle stem of emittere "send out" (see emit). Meaning "a giving off or emitting, the act of sending or throwing out" is from 1610s.

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steam (v.)
Old English stiemen, stymen "emit vapor, emit a scent or odor," from the root of steam (n.). Meaning "go by steam power" is from 1831. Transitive sense from 1660s, "to emit as steam;" meaning "to treat with steam" is from 1798. Slang steam up (transitive) "make (someone) angry" is from 1922. Related: Steamed; steaming.
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reek (v.)

Middle English reken "to emit smoke," of smoke or stench, "to rise," from Old English recan (Anglian), reocan (West Saxon) "emit smoke," from Proto-Germanic *reukan (source also of Old Frisian reka "smoke," Middle Dutch roken, Dutch rieken "to smoke," Old High German riohhan "to smoke, steam," German rauchen "to smoke," riechen "to smell"); from the same source as the nouns (see reek (n.)).

Originally a strong verb, with past tense reac, past participle gereocen, but occasionally showing weak conjugation in Old English. Meaning "to emit a bad smell" is recorded from 1710 via sense "be heated and perspiring" (early 15c.). Related: Reeked; reeking.

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plink (v.)

"emit a short, sharp metallic sound," 1941, imitative. As a noun by 1971. Related: Plinked; plinking.

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sparkle (v.)
c. 1200, "to shine as if giving off sparks," frequentative verb form of Middle English sparke (see spark (v.)). Meaning "emit sparks" is from late 15c. Related: Sparkled; sparkling.
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foam (v.)
Old English famgian "to emit foam, to boil," from the source of foam (n.). Sense of "become foamy, to froth" is from late 14c. Transitive sense is from 1725. Related: Foamed; foaming.
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halitosis (n.)
"bad breath," 1874, coined in Modern Latin from Latin halitus "breath, exhalation, steam, vapor" (which is related to halare "to breathe, emit vapor") + Greek-based noun suffix -osis.
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olfaction (n.)

"sense of smell, faculty of smelling," 1846, noun of action from Latin olfactus, past participle of olfacere "to smell, get the smell of" (transitive), from olere "to emit a smell" (see odor) + facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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