Etymology
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emerge (v.)

"to rise from or out of anything that surrounds, covers, or conceals; come forth; appear, as from concealment," 1560s, from French émerger and directly from Latin emergere "bring forth, bring to light," intransitively "arise out or up, come forth, come up, come out, rise," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + mergere "to dip, sink" (see merge). The notion is of rising from a liquid by virtue of buoyancy. Related: Emerged; emerging.

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re-emerge (v.)

also reemerge, "to emerge again or anew," 1775; see re- "back, again" + emerge (v.). Related: Re-emerged; re-emerging; re-emergence (1801).

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emersion (n.)

"reappearance, act of emerging," 1630s, noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin emergere "to rise out or up" (see emerge). Originally of eclipses and occultations.

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emergence (n.)
1640s, "unforeseen occurrence," from French émergence, from emerger, from Latin emergere "rise up" (see emerge). Meaning "an emerging, process of coming forth" is from 1704.
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emergent (adj.)
late 14c., "rising from what surrounds it, coming into view," from Latin emergentem (nominative emergens), present participle of emergere "to rise out or up" (see emerge).
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emergency (n.)
"unforeseen occurrence requiring immediate attention," 1630s, from Latin emergens, present participle of emergere "to rise out or up" (see emerge). Or from emerge + -ency. As an adjective by 1881.
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emersed (adj.)

in botany, "standing out of or raised above water, raised partially above surrounding leaves," 1680s, formed as if a past-participle adjective, from Latin emersus, past participle of emergere "rise out or up" (see emerge).

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cutworm (n.)

larvae of certain moths, 1768, from cut (v.) + worm (n.). At night they emerge from the ground and cut off at the surface tender plants.

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june-bug (n.)
also junebug, 1829, a popular name for various beetles which emerge in adult form and are active in June, from June + bug (n.). The earliest uses are Southern U.S.; in the north it is used of a different beetle (but from similar large white grubs).
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exist (v.)

"to have actual being of any kind, actually be at a certain moment or throughout a certain period of time," c. 1600, from French exister (17c.), from Latin existere/exsistere "to step out, stand forth, emerge, appear; exist, be" (see existence). "The late appearance of the word is remarkable" [OED]. Middle English often used ibēn, ibeon (based on be) for "to exist."  Related: Existed; existing.

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