Etymology
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pixel (n.)

"small, square single-colored display elements that comprise an image," 1969, coined to describe the photographic elements of a television image, from pix + first syllable of element.

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polysynthesis (n.)

"composition of many elements or an abnormal number or variety of elements," 1837; see poly- "many" + synthesis. Related: Polysynthetic (by 1816 of crystals, also 1816 of languages).

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elemental (adj.)
late 15c., "pertaining to the four elements," from Medieval Latin elementalis, from Latin elementum (see element). Meaning "pertaining to the powers of nature" is from 1823. The noun in the occult sense "a spirit of the elements" is from 1877. Related: Elementally.
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elementary (adj.)

late 14c., "having the nature of one of the four elements," from Latin elementarius "belonging to the elements or rudiments," from elementum (see element). Meaning "rudimentary, involving first principles" is from 1540s; meaning "simple" is from 1620s. In elementary school (1841) it has the "rudimentary" sense.

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naloxone (n.)

name of a chemical antagonistic to narcotics, 1964, from elements of N-allynoroxymorphone.

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decomposable (adj.)

"capable of being resolved into constituent elements," 1784; see decompose + -able. Related: Decomposability.

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Fortran (n.)
computer programming language, 1956, from combination of elements from formula + translation.
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stoichiometry (n.)
"science of calculating the quantities of chemical elements involved in chemical reactions," 1807, from German Stöchiometrie (1792), coined by German chemist Jeremias Benjamin Richter (1762-1807) from Greek stoikheion "one of a row; shadow-line of a sundial," in plural "the elements" (from PIE *steigh- "to stride, step, rise") + -metry "a measuring of." Related: Stoichiometric.
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Panavision (n.)

1955, proprietary name of a type of wide-screen lens, a word formed from elements of panorama + vision.

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dopamine 

compound organic chemical, 1959, from DOPA, the amino acid (from first letter of elements of dioxyphenylalanine), + amine.

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