Etymology
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electricity (n.)

1640s (Browne, from Gilbert's Modern Latin), from electric (q.v.) + -ity. Originally in reference to friction.

Electricity seems destined to play a most important part in the arts and industries. The question of its economical application to some purposes is still unsettled, but experiment has already proved that it will propel a street car better than a gas jet and give more light than a horse. [Ambrose Bierce, "The Cynic's Word Book," 1906]
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electrical (adj.)
1630s, "giving off electricity when rubbed," from electric + -al (1). Meaning "relating to electricity, run by electricity" is from 1746. Related: Electrically.
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photo-electric (adj.)

1863, "acting by the combination of light and electricity;" by 1880 as "producing light by means of electricity," from photo- + electric

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unipolar (adj.)
1812, originally in electricity, from uni- + polar. Related: Unipolarity.
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electrification (n.)
1748, "state of being charged with electricity," noun of action from electrify.
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electrify (v.)
1745, "to charge with electricity, cause electricity to pass through;" see electric + -fy. Figurative sense recorded by 1752. Meaning "convert a factory, industry, etc., to electrical power" is by 1902. Related: Electrified; electrifying.
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electrician (n.)
1751, "scientist concerned with electricity;" 1869 as "technician concerned with electrical systems and appliances;" see electric + -ian.
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capacitor (n.)
"device which stores electricity," 1926, from capacity, in reference to electrical conductors, with Latinate agent-noun ending.
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magneto-electric (adj.)

also magnetoelectric, 1831, "characterized by electricity produced by magnets," from magneto- + electric. Magneto-electric machine is from 1831.

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