Etymology
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ecclesiastical (adj.)

early 15c., from ecclesiastic + -al (1). Related: Ecclesiastically.

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attire (n.)

c. 1300, "equipment of a man-at-arms; apparel, dress, clothes," from attire (v.).

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attire (v.)

c. 1300, atiren, "to fit out, equip; to dress in finery, to adorn," from Old French atirer, earlier atirier "to equip, ready, prepare," from a- "to" (see ad-) + tire "order, row, dress" (see tier). Related: Attired; attiring.

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black-tie (n.)

as an article of male attire, 1848, from black (adj.) + tie (n.). As an adjective, indicating the style of formal attire that features it, or situations where such is the proper dress, by 1933.

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dressmaker (n.)

also dress-maker, "one whose occupation is the making of articles of feminine attire," 1803, from dress (n.) + maker.

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foppery (n.)

1540s, "a foolish action," from fop + -ery. Meaning "behavior and manner of a fop" in the "dandy" sense is from 1690s; meaning "foppish attire" is from 1711.

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broad-brim (adj.)

as a style of hat, 1680s, from broad (adj.) + brim (n.). Broad-brimmed in 18c.-19c. suggested "Quaker male," from their characteristic attire.

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officeship (n.)

early 15c., "performance of ecclesiastical duties," from office + -ship.

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diabolism (n.)

"actions or influence of the Devil; conduct worthy of the Devil," 1610s, from Ecclesiastical Greek diabolos "devil" (see devil (n.)) + -ism.

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abbe (n.)

1520s, title given in France to "every one who wears an ecclesiastical dress" [Littré, quoted in OED], especially one having no assigned ecclesiastical duty but acting as a private tutor, etc., from French abbé (12c.), from Late Latin abbatem, accusative of abbas (see abbot). See Century Dictionary for distinctions.

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