Etymology
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earthly (adj.)

Old English eorþlic "worldly, pertaining to this world" (as opposed to spiritual or heavenly); see earth (n.) + -ly (1). The sense "belonging to or originating in the earth" is from mid-15c.

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unearthly (adj.)

1610s, "heavenly, sublime," from un- (1) "not" + earthly. Sense of "ghostly, weird" is attested by 1802. Related: Unearthliness.

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terrene (adj.)
"earthly, terrestrial, of or pertaining to the earth," c. 1300, from Anglo-French terreine, Old French terrien, from Latin terrenus "on the earth, earthly," from terra "earth" (from PIE root *ters- "to dry").
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earth-bound (adj.)

c. 1600, "firmly fixed in or on the earth," from earth (n.) + bound (adj.). Figurative sense "bound by earthly ties or interests" is from 1869.

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temporal (adj.)
late 14c., "worldly, secular;" also "terrestrial, earthly; temporary, lasting only for a time," from Old French temporal "earthly," and directly from Latin temporalis "of time, denoting time; but for a time, temporary," from tempus (genitive temporis) "time, season, moment, proper time or season," from Proto-Italic *tempos- "stretch, measure," which according to de Vaan is from PIE *temp-os "stretched," from root *ten- "to stretch," the notion being "stretch of time." Related: Temporally.
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Shangri-La (n.)

imaginary earthly paradise, by 1938, from Shangri-La, name of Tibetan utopia in James Hilton's novel "Lost Horizon" (1933, film version 1937). In Tibetan, la means "mountain pass."

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worldly (adj.)
Old English woruldlic "earthly, secular," from the roots of world and like (adj.). A common Germanic compound (Old Frisian wraldlik, Old Saxon weroldlik, Middle Dutch wereldlik, German weltlich, Old Norse veraldligr). Worldly-wise is recorded from c. 1400.
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terrestrial (adj.)
late 14c., "of or pertaining to the earth," with + -al (1) + from Latin terrestris "earthly, of the earth, on land," from terra "earth" (from PIE root *ters- "to dry"). Originally opposed to celestial; natural history sense of "living on land" is attested from 1630s. The noun meaning "a human being, a mortal" is recorded from 1590s.
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bliss (n.)
Old English blis, also bliðs "bliss, merriment, happiness, grace, favor," from Proto-Germanic *blithsjo (source also of Old Saxon blidsea, blizza), from *blithiz "gentle, kind" (see blithe) + *-tjo noun suffix. Originally mostly of earthly happiness, in later Old English of spiritual joy, perfect felicity, the joy of heaven; influenced by association with unrelated bless.
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perfectionist (n.)

1650s, from perfection + -ist. Originally theological, "one who believes moral perfection may be attained in earthly existence, one who believes a sinless life is obtainable." The belief has prevailed from time to time in some Catholic communities, Arminian Methodists, the Society of Friends, etc. The sense of "one satisfied only with the highest standards" is from 1934. Related: Perfectionism.

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