Etymology
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dwelling (n.)

"place of residence, habitation, abode," mid-14c., verbal noun from dwell (v.). Earlier it meant "a stupor" (early 14c.); "delay, procrastination; a staying in a place" (c. 1300).

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hogan (n.)
Navaho Indian dwelling, 1871, American English, from Athapaskan (Navaho) hoghan "dwelling, house."
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habitation (n.)

late 14c., "act or fact of dwelling;" also "place of lodging, abode," from Old French habitacion, abitacion "a dwelling; act of dwelling" (12c.) or directly from Latin habitationem (nominative habitatio) "a dwelling," noun of action from past-participle stem of habitare "to live, inhabit, dwell," frequentative of habere "to have, to hold, possess" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive").

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tref (n.)
Welsh, literally "hamlet, home, town," from PIE *treb- "dwelling" (see tavern).
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farm-house (n.)
also farmhouse, "principal dwelling-house of a farm," 1590s, from farm (n.) + house (n.).
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tepee (n.)
1743, ti pee, from Dakota (Siouan) thipi "dwelling, house."
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tavern (n.)
late 13c., "wine shop," later "public house" (mid-15c.), from Old French taverne (mid-13c.) "shed made of boards, booth, stall," also "tavern, inn," from Latin taberna "shop, inn, tavern," originally "hut, shed, rude dwelling," possibly [Klein] by dissimilation from *traberna, from trabs (genitive trabis) "beam, timber," from PIE *treb- "dwelling" (source also of Lithuanian troba "a building," Old Welsh treb "house, dwelling," Welsh tref "a dwelling," Irish treb "residence," Old English ðorp "village, hamlet, farm, estate"). If so, the original meaning probably was "wooden shed."
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yurt (n.)
"house or hut of the natives of north and central Asia," 1784, ultimately from Russian yurta, from a Turkic language and originally meaning "home, dwelling."
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caveman (n.)

also cave-man, "prehistoric human dwelling in a natural cave," 1865, from cave (n.) + man (n.). Related: Cave-woman (1904).

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hermitage (n.)
late 13c., "dwelling place of a hermit," from Old French hermitage/ermitage "hermitage, solitude," from hermit (see hermit). Earlier in the same sense in English was hermitorie (c. 1200), from Medieval Latin hermitorium. Transferred sense of "solitary or secluded dwelling place" is from 1640s.
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