Etymology
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durable (adj.)

late 14c., "having the quality of continuing long in being," from Old French durable (11c.) and directly from Latin durabilis "lasting, permanent," from durare "to harden," from durus "hard," from PIE *dru-ro-, suffixed variant form of root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast." From late 13c. as a surname (probably meaning "steadfast"). Related: Durably. Durable goods attested from 1930.

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goods (n.)
"property," late 13c., from plural of good (n.), which had the same sense in Old English. Meaning "saleable commodities" is mid-15c.; colloquial sense of "stolen articles" is from 1900; hence figurative use, "evidence of guilt."
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heavy-duty (adj.)
"durable, strong," 1903; see heavy (adj.) + duty.
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depreciation (n.)

1767, "a lowering of value" (originally of currency), noun of action from depreciate. Sense of "a belittling, deliberate underestimation of the merits of a person, action, or thing" is from 1790. Meaning "loss of value of a durable good by age or wear" is from 1900.

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shoplifting (n.)

"pilfering of goods from a shop," 1690s; see shoplifter.

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in re (prep.)

"in the matter of, in the (legal) case of," c. 1600, probably from Duns Scotus; Latin, from re, ablative of res "property, goods; matter, thing, affair," from Proto-Italic *re-, from PIE *reh-i- "wealth, goods" (source also of Sanskrit rayi- "property, goods," Avestan raii-i- "wealth").

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merchantman (n.)

"a ship employed in the transportation of goods," 1620s, from merchant + man.

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belongings (n.)
"goods, effects, possessions," 1817, from plural of verbal noun from belong.
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inscribe (v.)
1550s, "to write on or in" (something durable and conspicuous), from Latin inscribere "to write on or in (something)," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Meaning "to dedicate (by means of an inscription)" is from 1640s. Form inscriven is from late 14c. Related: Inscribed; inscribing.
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effects (n.)
"goods, property," 1704, plural of effect (n.); after a use of French effets.
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