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drip (n.)

mid-15c., drippe, "a drop of liquid," from drip (v.). From 1660s as "a falling or letting fall in drops." Medical sense of "continuous slow introduction of fluid into the body" is by 1933. The slang meaning "stupid, feeble, or dull person" is by 1932, perhaps from earlier American English slang sense "nonsense" (by 1919).

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drip (v.)

c. 1300, drippen, "to fall in drops; let fall in drops," from Old English drypan, also dryppan, from Proto-Germanic *drupjanan (source also of Old Norse dreypa, Middle Danish drippe, Dutch druipen, Old High German troufen, German triefen), perhaps from a PIE root *dhreu-. Related to droop and drop. Related: Dripped; dripping.

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pot (v.)

"to put in a pot or pots," 1610s, from pot (n.1). Related: Potted; potting. Earlier it meant "to drink from a pot" (1590s). From 1860 as "shoot or kill game; shoot an enemy" (compare pot-hunter, potshot).

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pot (n.2)
"marijuana," 1938, probably a shortened form of Mexican Spanish potiguaya "marijuana leaves."
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pot (n.1)

"deep, circular vessel," from late Old English pott and Old French pot "pot, container, mortar" (also in erotic senses), both from a general Low Germanic (Old Frisian pott, Middle Dutch pot) and Romanic word from Vulgar Latin *pottus, which is of uncertain origin, said by Barnhart and OED to be unconnected to Late Latin potus "drinking cup." Similar Celtic words are said to be borrowed from English and French.

Specifically as a drinking vessel from Middle English. Slang meaning "large sum of money staked on a bet" is attested from 1823; that of "aggregate stakes in a card game" is from 1847, American English.

Pot roast "meat (generally beef) cooked in a pot with little water and allowed to become brown, as if roasted," is from 1881. Pot-plant is by 1816 as "plant grown in a pot." The phrase go to pot "be ruined or wasted" (16c.) suggests cooking, perhaps meat cut up for the pot. In phrases, the pot calls the kettle black-arse (said of one who blames another for what he himself is also guilty of) is from c. 1700; shit or get off the pot is traced by Partridge to Canadian armed forces in World War II. To keep the pot boiling "provide the necessities of life" is from 1650s.

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pot-pie (n.)

also potpie, "pie made by lining the inner surface of a pot with pastry and filling it with meat and seasoning and baking it," 1807, American English, from pot (n.1) + pie (n.).

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pot-hook (n.)

also pothook, "hook secured in a chimney for supporting a pot over a fire," late 15c., from pot (n.1) + hook (n.).

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pot-stick (n.)

also potstick, "stick for stirring porridge, etc.," early 15c., from pot (n.1) + stick (n.).

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flower-pot (n.)
also flowerpot, 1590s, from flower (n.) + pot (n.1).
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pot-bellied (adj.)

also potbellied, "having a protuberant belly," 1650s, from pot (n.1) + bellied. As a type of stove from 1884.

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