Etymology
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downward (adv.)

"from a higher to a lower place, state, or condition," late 12c., from down (adv.) + -ward. As a preposition, "down," by late 14c. As an adjective, "moving or tending from a higher to a lwer place, state, or condition," from 1550s. As an adverb Old English had aduneweard. Downwards (c. 1200), with adverbial genitive, had a parallel in Old English ofduneweardes.

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declivity (n.)

"a downward slope," 1610s, from French déclivité, from Latin declivitatem (nominative declivitas) "a slope, declivity," from declivis "a sloping downward," from de "down" (see de-) + clivus "a slope," from PIE *klei-wo-, suffixed form of root *klei- "to lean."

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downhill (adv.)

"in a descending direction," late 14c., from down (adv.) + hill (n.).  From 1590s as a noun, "downward slope of a hill;" meaning "downhill skiing race" is from 1960. As an adjective, "sloping downward, descending," from 1727.

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tailspin (n.)

"downward spiraling dive of an aircraft," 1916, from tail (n.1) + spin (n.). Figurative sense of "state of loss of control" is from 1928.

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nod (n.)

"short, quick, forward and downward motion of the head," voluntary or not, 1530s, from nod (v.).

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adown (adv.)

"to a lower place," Old English adune (adv.), originally a prepositional phrase, of dune "down, downward;" see a- (1) + down (adv.).

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down (n.3)

1710, "a downward movement," from down (adv.). Football sense of "an attempt to advance the ball" is by 1882.

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deep-set (adj.)

"set far downward or inward," originally of eyes, late 14c., from deep (adv.) + set (adj.).

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downgrade (v.)

also down-grade, "to lower in rank, status, etc.," 1930, from down (adv.) + grade (v.). Related: Downgraded; downgrading. As a noun, "a downward slope," from 1858.

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deflect (v.)
Origin and meaning of deflect

1550s, "cause to turn aside" (transitive), from Latin deflectere "to bend (something) aside or downward," from de "away" (see de-) + flectere "to bend," which is of uncertain origin. The intransitive sense of "to turn away or aside" is from 1610s. Related: Deflected; deflecting.

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