Etymology
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dormant (adj.)

late 14c., "fixed in place," from Old French dormant (12c.), present participle of dormir "to sleep," from Latin dormire "to sleep," from PIE root *drem- "to sleep" (source also of Old Church Slavonic dremati "to sleep, doze," Greek edrathon "I slept," Sanskrit drati "sleeps").

Meaning "in a resting situation, lying down with the head on the forepaws" (in heraldry, of beasts) is from c. 1500. Meaning "sleeping, asleep" is from 1620s. General sense of "in a state of rest or inactivity" is from c. 1600. Of volcanoes from 1760.

The Neapolitans are never so much afraid of this fiery Mountain as when its Flames lie, as 'twere, dormant ; for then it is that they live in constant Fear of a fresh huge Eruption, or, much worse, an Earthquake. [from the entry for "Vesuvius" in Brice's "Grand Gazetter Or Topographic Dictionary," 1760]
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dormancy (n.)

1723, state of being dormant, quiescence;" see dormant + -cy. Middle English had dormitacioun "sleep, sleeping" (mid-15c.)

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dormer (n.)

also dormer-window, "window standing vertically in a projection built out to receive it from a sloping roof," 1590s, from French dormeor "sleeping room," from dormir "to sleep," from Latin dormire (see dormant). So called because they were chiefly in upper bedrooms.

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dormouse (n.)

long-tailed Old World rodent noted for its state of semi-hibernation in winter, early 15c., possibly from Anglo-French *dormouse "tending to be dormant" (from stem of dormir "to sleep," see dormant), with the second element mistaken for mouse; or perhaps it is from a Middle English dialectal compound of mouse (n.) and French dormir. French dormeuse, fem. of dormeur "sleeper" is attested only from 17c.

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dormitory (n.)

mid-15c., "place, building, or room to sleep in," originally of a monastery or nunnery, from Latin dormitorium "sleeping place," from dormire "to sleep" (see dormant). From the vernacular Old French form dortor Middle English had the word earlier as dortour (c. 1300). Old English had slæpern "dormitory," with ending as in barn. As "residence hall of a college or university" by 1718.

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self-realization (n.)

"the making actual, by an exertion of will, that which lies dormant in one's soul; the fulfilment, by one's own effort, of the potential in one's soul," 1839, from self- + realization.

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hibernation (n.)

1660s, "action of passing the winter" (of plants, insect eggs, etc.), from Latin hibernationem (nominative hibernatio) "the action of passing the winter," noun of action from past participle stem of hibernare "to winter, pass the winter, occupy winter quarters;" related to hiems "winter," from PIE root *gheim- "winter." Meaning "dormant condition of animals" is from 1789.

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Kilimanjaro 

dormant volcano in Tanzania, it is the highest mountain in Africa. The name is of unknown origin; the first element appears to be Swahili kilima "(little) mountain," but even this is uncertain.  See J.A. Hutchinson, "The Meaning of Kilimanjaro," in Tanganyika Notes and Records, 1965.

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chrysalis (n.)

"form in the life-cycle of butterflies, moths, etc., between larval and adult, consisting of a dormant pupa in a hard outer case," also the case itself, c. 1600, from Latin chrysallis, from Greek khrysallis (genitive khrysallidos) "golden colored pupa of the butterfly," from khrysos "gold" (see chryso-), + second element meaning something like "sheath." Seeking a plural, OED leans toward the classically correct chrysalides."

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latent (adj.)

mid-15c., "concealed, secret," from Latin latentem (nominative latens) "lying hid, concealed, secret, unknown," present participle of latere "lie hidden, lurk, be concealed," from PIE *late-, suffixed form of root *lādh- "to be hidden" (source also of Greek lēthē "forgetfulness, oblivion," lēthargos "forgetful," lathre "secretly, by stealth," lathrios "stealthy," lanthanein "to be hidden;" Old Church Slavonic lajati "to lie in wait for"). Meaning "dormant, undeveloped" is from 1680s, originally in medicine.

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