Etymology
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dress (n.)

c. 1600, "a garment or assemblage of garments," originally any clothing, especially that appropriate to rank or to some ceremony; the specific sense of "woman's garment consisting of a skirt and waist" is recorded by 1630s, with overtones of "made not merely to clothe but to adorn." Dress rehearsal first recorded 1828.

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diving (n.)

late 14c., verbal noun from dive (v.). Diving-board is attested by 1861. Diving-bell is from 1660s.

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dress (v.)

c. 1300, "make straight; direct, guide, control; prepare for cooking," from Old French dresser, drecier "raise (oneself); address, prepare; lift, raise, hoist; set up, arrange, set (a table), serve (food); straighten, put right, direct," from Vulgar Latin *directiare "make straight," from Latin directus "direct, straight," past participle of dirigere "set straight," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + regere "to direct, to guide, keep straight" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line").

Sense of "decorate, adorn" is from late 14c., as is that of "put on clothing." The older sense survives in military dress ranks "align columns of troops." Of males, in reference to the position of the sex organ in trousers, by 1961.

Dress up "attire elaborately, put on one's best clothing" is from 1670s; dress down "wear clothes less formal than expected" is by 1960. Transitive use of dress (someone) down, "scold, reprimand," is by 1876, earlier simply dress (1769), in which the sense is ironical. In Middle English, dress up meant "get up" and dress down meant "to kneel." Related: Dressed; dressing.

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dress-up (n.)

"act of dressing up in one's best clothes," 1865, from the verbal phrase (17c.); see dress (v.) + up (adv.).

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head-dress (n.)
also headdress, 1703, from head (n.) + dress (n.) in the older, more general, sense.
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sun-dress (n.)
also sundress, 1942, from sun (n.) + dress (n.).
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tuck (n.)
late 14c., "flattened fold in clothing, pleat," from tuck (v.). As a folded-up diving position, from 1951.
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kingfisher (n.)
type of colorful European diving bird, mid-15c., originally king's fisher, for obscure reasons; see king + fisher.
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grebe (n.)
diving bird, 1766, from French grèbe (16c.), of unknown origin, possibly from Breton krib "a comb," since some species are crested.
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scuba (n.)

also SCUBA, 1952, American English, acronym for self-contained underwater breathing apparatus. Scuba-diving is attested by 1956.

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