Etymology
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disturbance (n.)

late 13c., "mental distress, emotional disorder of the mind, grief," from Old French destorbance (12c., Old North French distorbance), from destourber, from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid).

Meaning "public disturbance, political agitation" is from c. 1300; that of "violent interruption of peace or unity" is late 14c.; it is the sense in disturbance of the (king's) peace," early 15c.

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perturbation (n.)

late 14c., perturbacioun, "mental disturbance, state of being perturbed," from Old French perturbacion "disturbance, confusion" (14c.) and directly from Latin perturbationem (nominative perturbatio) "confusion, disorder, disturbance," noun of action from past participle stem of perturbare (see perturb).

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disorder (n.)

1520s, "lack of regular arrangement;" 1530s, "tumult, disturbance of the peace;" from disorder (v.). Meaning "an ailment, a disturbance of the body or mind" is by 1704.

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derangement (n.)

1737, "disturbance of regular order," from French dérangement (17c.), from déranger (see derange). Mental sense "disturbance of the intellect or reason" is from 1800.

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brawl (n.)
mid-15c., "noisy disturbance," from brawl (v.). Meaning "fist-fight" is by 1873.
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stir (n.)
"commotion, disturbance, tumult," late 14c. (in phrase on steir), probably from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse styrr "disturbance, tumult," from the same root as stir (v.)). The sense of "movement, bustle" (1560s) probably is from the English verb.
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ruction (n.)

"disturbance, disorderly dispute," 1825, a dialectal or colloquial word of unknown origin. Perhaps from eruption or an altered shortening of insurrection.

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broil (n.2)
"a confused disturbance, quarrel," 1520s, from broil (v.2).
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dust-up (n.)

also dustup, "fight, quarrel, disturbance," 1897, from dust + up; perhaps from dust "confusion, disturbance" (1590s), also compare kick up a dust "cause an uproar" (1753). To dust (someone's) coat was ironical for "to beat (someone) soundly" (1680s).

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ruckus (n.)

"uproar, disturbance, commotion," 1890, American English, possibly a blend of ruction and rumpus.

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