Etymology
Advertisement
disruption (n.)

"a rending asunder, a bursting apart, forcible separation into parts," early 15c., originally medical, "laceration of tissue," general sense from 1640s, from Medieval Latin disruptionem (nominative disruptio) "a breaking asunder," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin disrumpere "break apart, split, shatter, break to pieces," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + rumpere "to break," from PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
disrupt (v.)

"break or burst asunder, separate forcibly." 1650s, but rare before c. 1820, from Latin disruptus, past participle of disrumpere "break apart, split, shatter, break to pieces," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + rumpere "to break," from PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)). Or perhaps a back-formation from disruption. Earlier was disrump (1580s). Related: Disrupted; disrupting.

Related entries & more 
disruptive (adj.)

"causing or tending to cause disruption," 1862; see disrupt + -ive. From 1840 in reference to electrical discharges (in this sense probably from French). By 1876 as "produced by disruption." Related: Disruptively; disruptiveness.

Related entries & more 
disorganization 

"disruption or destruction of order, a breaking up of order or system, absence of orderly arrangement," 1790, noun of action or state from disorganize.

Related entries & more 
cataclasm (n.)

"a breaking asunder, a violent disruption," 1829, from Latinized form of Greek kataklasm "breakage," from kata "down" (see cata-) +  klan,klaein "to break," which is perhaps from PIE *kla-, variant of root *kel- "to strike" (see holt), but more likely of uncertain origin [Beekes]. Related: Cataclastic, in geology, in reference to a structural character due to intense crushing, 1885.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
breakup (n.)
also break-up, "a disruption, dissolution of connection, separation of a mass into parts," 1795, from verbal expression break up "separate, dissolve" (mid-15c.); see break (v.) + up (adv.). The verbal phrase was used of plowland, later of groups, assemblies, etc.; of things (also of marriages, relationships), from mid-18c. Break it up as a command to stop a fight, etc., is recorded from 1936.
Related entries & more 
break (n.)
c. 1300, "act of breaking, forcible disruption or separation," from break (v.). Sense in break of day "first appearance of light in the morning" is from 1580s; meaning "sudden, marked transition from one course, place, or state to another" is by 1725. Sense of "short interval between spells of work" (originally between lessons at school) is from 1861. Meaning "stroke of luck" is attested by 1911, probably an image from billiards (where the break that scatters the ordered balls and starts the game is attested from 1865). Meaning "stroke of mercy" is from 1914. Jazz musical sense of "improvised passage, solo" is from 1920s. Broadcasting sense is by 1941.
Related entries & more