Etymology
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dispose (v.)

late 14c., disposen, "set in order, place in a particular order; give direction or tendency to; incline the mind or heart of," from Old French disposer (13c.) "arrange, order, control, regulate" (influenced in form by poser "to place"), from Latin disponere "put in order, arrange, distribute," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Related: Disposed; disposing.

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redispose (v.)

also re-dispose, "dispose again or anew," 1733; see re- "back, again" + dispose (v.). Related: Redisposed; redisposing.

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disposed (adj.)

late 14c., "inclined, in the mood, having a mind (to do something)," past-participle adjective from dispose. Meaning "having a particular turn of mind or mental tendency" (with well-, ill-, etc.) is from early 15c.

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disposal (n.)

1620s, "power to make use of, right to dispose of or control;" see dispose + -al (2). Meaning "a disposing" (of a daughter by marriage, of money by a will, of an estate by sale, etc.) is from 1650s; of waste material, from c. 1960, originally in medical use.

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disposable (adj.)

1640s, "that may be done without;" see dispose + -able. Sense of "free to be used as the occasion may require, available" is from 1650s. Meaning "designed to be discarded after one use" is from 1943, originally of diapers, soon of everything; replaced throw-away (1928) in this sense. First recorded use of disposable income (which preserves the older sense) is from 1766.

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disposition (n.)

late 14c., disposicioun, "ordering, management, a setting in order, arrangement," also "tendency of mind, aptitude, inclination," from Old French disposicion (12c.) "arrangement, order; mood, state of mind" and directly from Latin dispositionem (nominative dispositio) "arrangement, management," noun of action from past-participle stem of disponere "to put in order, arrange" (see dispose).

Meaning "frame of mind, attitude, inclination; temperament, natural tendency or constitution of the mind" (late 14c.) are from astrological use of the word for "position of a planet as a determining influence" (late 14c.). Related: Dispositional.

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raffle (v.)

"dispose of by raffle; try the chance of a raffle," 1851, from raffle (n.). Earlier "to cast dice" (1670s). Related: Raffled; raffling.

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will (v.2)

Old English willian "to determine by act of choice," from will (n.). From mid-15c. as "dispose of by will or testament." Often difficult to distinguish from will (v.1).

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remainder (v.)

 early 15c., in law, of rights of ownership, "to devolve upon a second party," from remainder (n.). The meaning "dispose of (the remaining unsold editions of a book) at a reduced price" is by 1902, from the noun in the publication sense. Related: Remaindered.

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accoutrement (n.)

usually plural, accoutrements, "personal clothing and equipment," 1540s, from French accoustrement (Modern French accoutrement), from accoustrer, from Old French acostrer "arrange, dispose, put on (clothing)," probably originally "sew up" (see accouter).

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