Etymology
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miffed (adj.)

"displeased, slightly offended," by 1824, past-participle adjective from miff (v.). Sir Walter Scott calls it "a women's phrase."

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dislike (v.)

1540s (implied in disliking), "be displeased with, regard with some aversion or displeasure," a hybrid which ousted native mislike as the opposite of like (v.). In common with disgust, it sometimes reversed the direction of its action and meant (in this case) "annoy, vex, displease" (1570s), but this sense is archaic or obsolete. Related: Disliked; disliking. The noun sense of "feeling of being displeased" is from 1590s. English in 16c. also had dislove "hate, cease to love," but it did not survive.

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disaffected (adj.)

"estranged, hostile, having the affections alienated," usually in reference to one displeased with the actions of an authority or a party, "disloyal," 1630s, past-participle adjective from disaffect. Related: Disaffectedly; disaffectedness.

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mislike (v.)

Old English mislician "to be displeasing to;" see mis- (1) + like (v.). Sense of "to be displeased with, dislike, be averse to" is attested from c. 1200. Related: Misliked; misliking. As a noun, "state of not liking, aversion," from c. 1300.

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displease (v.)

late 14c., displesen, "fail to please, be disagreeable to," from Old French desplais-, present-tense stem of desplaisir "to displease" (13c., Modern French déplaire), from Latin displicere "displease," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + placere "to please" (see please (v.)). Related: Displeased; displeasing.

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chuff 

as an adjective, "pleased, happy," 1860, British dialect, from obsolete chuff "swollen with fat" (1520s). A second British dialectal chuff has an opposite meaning, "displeased, gruff" (1832), from chuff "rude fellow," or, as Johnson has it, "a coarse, fat-headed, blunt clown" (mid-15c.), which is of unknown origin. Related: Chuffed "pleased" (1957).

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indignant (adj.)
1580s, from Latin indignantem (nominative indignans) "impatient, reluctant, indignant," present participle of indignari "to be displeased at, be offended, resent, deem unworthy," from indignus "unworthy," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + dignus "worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting," from PIE *dek-no-, suffixed form of root *dek- "to take, accept." Related: Indignantly.
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indignation (n.)
c. 1200, from Old French indignacion "fury, rage; disrespect," or directly from Latin indignationem (nominative indignatio) "indignation, displeasure; a provocation, cause for indignation," noun of action from past participle stem of indignari "regard as unworthy, be angry or displeased at," from indignus "unworthy," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + dignus "worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting," from PIE *dek-no-, suffixed form of root *dek- "to take, accept." The indignation meeting (1835) once was a common American way to express popular outrage by passing and publishing resolutions.
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gloom (n.)
1590s, originally Scottish, "a sullen look," probably from gloom (v.) "look sullen or displeased" (late 14c., gloumen), of unknown origin; perhaps from an unrecorded Old English verb or from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian dialectal glome "to stare somberly"), or from Middle Low German glum "turbid," Dutch gluren "to leer." Not considered to be related to Old English glom "twilight" (see gloaming).

Sense of "darkness, obscurity" is first recorded 1629 in Milton's poetry; that of "melancholy, dejection, cloudiness or cheerless heaviness of mind" is from 1744; but gloomy with a corresponding sense is attested from 1580s.
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irk (v.)

early 15c., irken, "to trouble (someone), disturb, hinder, annoy;" earlier "be lax, slow, or unwilling (in doing something); be displeased or discontented" (early 14c.); "be weary of, be disgusted with" (c. 1400); of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old Norse yrka "to work" (see work (v.)).

Watkins suggests it is related to Old Norse yrkja "work." Middle High German erken "to disgust" also has been suggested. A Middle English adjective, irk, meaning "weary, tired, bored; distressed, troubled; troublesome, annoying," is attested from c. 1300 in Northern and Midlands writing; it is sometimes said to be from the verb, but it is older, and Middle English Compendium says this is probably Celtic, and compares Old Irish arcoat "he injures," erchoat "harm, injury."

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