Etymology
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incompetence (n.)

1660s, "inadequacy;" 1716, "want of skill," from or modeled on French incompétence (16c.), from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + compétence (see competence). Native formation incompetency is older (1610s).

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fool-proof (adj.)

also foolproof, 1902, American English, "safe against the incompetence of a fool," from fool (n.1) + adjectival sense from proof (n.).

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punnet (n.)

"small, round, broad, shallow basket," for displaying fruits or flowers, 1822, chiefly British, of obscure origin.

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precautious (adj.)

"using precaution, displaying previous care or caution," "1680s, from precaution + -ous. Related: Precautiously; precautiousness.

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inability (n.)

mid-15c., inhabilite, "disqualification for office," from in- (1) + ability. Earlier was unability "incapability; incompetence" (late 14c.). General sense "state of being unable" is recorded by c. 1500.

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knowledgeable (adj.)

also knowledgable, c. 1600, "capable of being known, recognizable" (a 17c. sense now obsolete), from knowledge in its Middle English verbal sense + -able. The sense of "having knowledge, displaying mental capacity" is from 1829 and probably a new formation.

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statement (n.)

1775, "what is stated," from state (v.) + -ment. From 1789 as "action of stating;" 1885 in the commercial sense "document displaying debits and credits."

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Peter Principle (n.)

1968, "in a hierarchy, every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence," named for (and by) Laurence Johnston Peter (1919-1990) Canadian-born U.S. educationalist and author, who described it in his book of the same name (1969).

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artistic (adj.)

"pertaining to art or artists" in any sense, but especially in the aesthetic sense; also "characterized by conformity with one of the fine arts; displaying excellence of design and execution," 1753, from French artistique, from artiste (see artist). Native artist-like was recorded from 1711; artistly from 1754; artistical from 1798. Related: Artistically.

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blasphemous (adj.)

"displaying blasphemy, irreverent to God or sacred things," early 15c., blasfemous, from Old French blasfemeus or directly from Late Latin blasphemus, from blasphemare "to blaspheme," from Greek blasphēmein "to speak lightly or amiss of sacred things, to slander," from blasphēmos "evil-speaking" (see blasphemy).

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