Etymology
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dismissal (n.)

"act of dismissing; state or fact of being dismissed," by 1795, formed on model of refusal, etc., from dismiss + -al (2); replacing earlier dismission (1540s); dismissing (late 15c.).

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heave (n.)

1570s, from heave (v.). Meaning "a dismissal" is from 1944.

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yah (interj.)

exclamation of defiance or dismissal, from 1812. Extended form yah-boo by 1910.

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sod (v.2)

in sod off (1960), British slang term of dismissal; see sod (n.2).

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mass (n.2)

"eucharistic service," Middle English messe, masse, from Old English mæsse, from Vulgar Latin *messa "eucharistic service," literally "dismissal," from Late Latin missa "dismissal," fem. past participle of mittere "to let go, send" (see mission).

Probably so called from the concluding words of the service, Ite, missa est, "Go, (the prayer) has been sent," or "Go, it is the dismissal." The Latin word sometimes was glossed in Old English as sendnes "send-ness." Meaning "musical setting of certain parts of the Catholic (or Anglican) liturgy" is by 1590s.

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nertz (interj.)

also nerts, 1932, originally American English college slang, colloquial or euphemistic pronunciation of nuts as a slang retort of defiance or dismissal (1931).

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dismissive (adj.)

1640s, "characterized by or appropriate to dismissal;" from dismiss + -ive. Meaning "contemptuous, tending to reject as insignificant" is recorded by 1922 (implied in dismissively). Related: Dismissiveness.

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dispatch (n.)

1540s, "dismissal after settlement of business," from dispatch (v.). Meaning "speed, haste" is from 1570s. Sense of "a written message sent speedily" is first attested 1580s; that of "a sending off or away" is from c. 1600.

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ouster (n.)

in law, "ejection from property, eviction by judicial process," 1530s, noun use of Anglo-French ouster "remove, evict" (see oust). For other such usages, see waiver. General sense of "dismissal, expulsion" is by 1961.

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removal (n.)

1590s, "act of taking away entirely;" see remove (v.) + -al (2). From 1640s specifically as "dismissal from an office or a post," also "act of changing one's habitation." Also occasionally a quasi-euphemism for "murder." The earlier noun was remove (n.); also removing, remeving (late 14c.).

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