Etymology
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dislocation (n.)
Origin and meaning of dislocation

c. 1400, dislocacioun, "displacement of parts," originally of bones of the limbs, from Old French dislocacion (14c.), or directly from Medieval Latin dislocationem (nominative dislocatio), noun of action from past participle stem of dislocare "put out of place," from Latin dis- "away" (see dis-) + locare "to place," from locus "a place," which is of uncertain origin. General sense is from c. 1600.

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spondylolisthesis (n.)

medical Latin, from Greek spondylos (see spondylo-) + oliothesis "dislocation, slipping."

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subluxation (n.)

"partial dislocation," 1680s, from Latin subluxationem (nominative subluxatio).

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luxation (n.)

"dislocation of a bone or joint," 1550s, from Late Latin luxationem (nominative luxatio) "a dislocation," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin luxare "dislocate," literally "oblique," from Greek loxos "bent to the side, slanting, oblique," figuratively "ambiguous," a word of uncertain origin.

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restorer (n.)

early 15c., restorour, in medicine (Chauliac), "one who resets a dislocation," from Old French restoreor, agent noun from restorer (see restore (v.)).

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disjuncture (n.)
Origin and meaning of disjuncture

"act of disjointing, state of being disjointed," c. 1400, originally surgical, "dislocation," from Medieval Latin disjunctura, from Latin disiungere from dis- (see dis-) + iungere "to join together," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join." Figurative use from 1680s.

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