Etymology
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discuss (v.)

late 14c., discussen, "to examine, investigate," from Latin discuss-, past participle stem of discutere "to dash to pieces, agitate, strike or shake apart," in Late Latin and Medieval Latin also "to discuss, examine, investigate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + quatere "to shake" (see quash).

Meaning "examine by argument, debate," the usual modern sense, is from mid-15c. (implied in discussing). Sense evolution in Latin appears to have been from "smash apart" to "scatter, disperse," then in post-classical times (via the mental process involved) to "investigate, examine," then to "debate." Related: Discussed.

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coze (v.)

"to chat," 1828, of uncertain origin; perhaps from French causer "to talk," from Latin causari "to plead, dispute, discuss a question," from causa (see cause (n.)).

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disputant (n.)

"one who argues in opposition to another," 1610s, from noun use of Latin disputantem (nominative disputans), present participle of disputare "weigh, examine, discuss, argue, explain" (see dispute (v.)).

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controvert (v.)

c. 1600, "dispute (something), oppose by argument" (a sense now obsolete); 1610s, "to make the subject of verbal contention, debate, discuss; contend against (someone) in argument," probably a back-formation from controversy. Related: Controverted; controverting; controvertible.

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dispute (v.)

c. 1300, "engage in argumentation or discussion," from Old French desputer (12c.) "dispute, fight over, contend for, discuss" and directly from Latin disputare "weigh, examine, discuss, argue, explain," from dis- "separately, apart" (see dis-) + putare "to count, consider," originally "to prune, make clean, clear up" (from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp").

The Latin word was used in Vulgate in sense of "to argue, contend with words." In English, transitive sense of "argue against, attempt to disprove, deny" is from 1510s. Related: Disputable; disputed; disputing.

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hatred (n.)
early 13c., from hate (v.) + rare suffix -red (indicating condition or state), from Old English ræden "state, condition," related to verb rædan "to advise, discuss, rule, read, guess" (from PIE root *re- "to reason, count;" compare the second element of kindred and proper names Æþelræd and Alfred).
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review (v.)

1570s, "re-view, examine or view again," from re- "again" + view (v.). The meaning "look back on, recall by the aid of memory" is from 1751; that of "consider or discuss critically to bring out the excellences and defects" especially in the form of a written essay is from 1781. Related: Reviewed; reviewing.

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indisputable (adj.)
1550s, from Late Latin indisputabilis, from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + disputabilis, from Latin disputare "to weigh, examine, discuss, argue, explain" (see dispute (v.)). Related: Indisputably.
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parley (v.)

late 14c., parlen, "to speak, talk, confer," probably a borrowing of Old French parler "to speak" (see parley (n.)). Related: Parleyed; parleying. Meaning "to discuss terms," especially "to confer with an enemy," as on exchange of prisoners, a cease-fire, etc., is by 1560s, from the noun.

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disputable (adj.)

"liable to be contested or called into question; controvertible," 1540s, from French disputable (16c.) or directly from Latin disputabilis, from disputare "weigh; examine; discuss, argue, explain" (see dispute (v.)). Related: Disputably.

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