Etymology
Advertisement
discovery (n.)

1550s (Hakluyt), "fact of discovering what was previously unknown;" see discover + -y (1). Earlier in this sense was discovering (mid-14c.). Meaning "that which is discovered" is from 1630s. Sense "act of revealing" (1580s) preserves the usual Middle English sense of discover but is now obsolete except in the legal sense of "disclosure by a party to an action" (of facts, documents, etc.), attested from 1715.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
rediscovery (n.)

also re-discovery, "a discovering again or afresh," 1747, from re- "back, again" + discovery.

Related entries & more 
find (n.)
"person or thing discovered, discovery of something valuable," 1825, from find (v.).
Related entries & more 
pre-Columbian (adj.)

also precolumbian, "occurring or existing before the European discovery of the Americas by Christopher Columbus," see pre- + Columbus.

Related entries & more 
indicia (n.)
"indications, discriminating marks," Latin plural of indicium "a notice, information, disclosure, discovery," from index (genitive indicis); see index (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ascertainment (n.)
1650s, "a reducing to certainty;" see ascertain + -ment. From 1799 as "act of attaining certainty, discovery as a result of investigation."
Related entries & more 
aha (interj.)

expression of surprise or delighted discovery, late 14c., from ah + ha.

This seely widewe and hire doughtres two ... cryden out "harrow!" and "weloway! A ha! þe fox!" and after him they ran [Chaucer]
Related entries & more 
luciferous (adj.)
"light-bringing, emitting light," 1650s, from Latin lucifer "light-bringing" (see Lucifer) + -ous. Figurative use "affording means of discovery" is earliest (1640s) and more common. Related: Luciferously.
Related entries & more 
a-ha (interj.)

also aha, exclamation of surprise or delighted discovery, late 14c., from ah + ha.

This seely widewe and hire doughtres two ... cryden out "harrow!" and "weloway! A ha! þe fox!" and after him they ran [Chaucer]
Related entries & more 
heuristic (adj.)
"serving to discover or find out," 1821, irregular formation from Greek heuriskein "to find; find out, discover; devise, invent; get, gain, procure" (from PIE *were- (2) "to find;" cognate with Old Irish fuar "I have found") + -istic. As a noun, from 1860. Greek had heuretikos "inventive," also heurema "an invention, a discovery; that which is found unexpectedly."
Related entries & more