Etymology
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discontinue (v.)

late 14c., discontinuen, "be interrupted, cease, stop," from Old French discontinuer (14c.), from Medieval Latin discontinuare "discontinue," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + Latin continuare "to continue" (see continue). Transitive sense "cause to cease" is from late 15c. Related: Discontinued; discontinuity; discontinuous; discontinuation.

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discontinuous (adj.)

"not continuous in space or time," 1718, from Medieval Latin discontinuus, from discontinuare (see discontinue). Related: Discontinuously; discontinuousness.

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discontinuity (n.)

"quality or state of being discontinuous, interrupted condition," 1560s, from Medieval Latin discontinuus, from discontinuare (see discontinue) + -ity.

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discontinuation (n.)

"interruption of continuity, separation of parts which form a connected series," 1610s, from French discontinuation (14c.), from Medieval Latin discontinuationem (nominative discontinuatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of discontinuare (see discontinue (v.)).

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discontinuance (n.)

"action of breaking off, intermission, interruption," late 14c., from Anglo-French discontinuance, from Old French discontinuer "to discontinue," from Medieval Latin discontinuare, from dis- "not" (see dis-) + Latin continuare "to continue" (see continue).

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intermit (v.)
1540s, "to interrupt" (obsolete); 1570s as "to discontinue for a time, suspend" (trans.) and "cease for a time" (intrans.), from Latin intermittere "to leave off, leave an interval, omit, suspend, interrupt, neglect," from inter "between" (see inter-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Intermitted; intermitting.
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prorogue (v.)

early 15c., prorogen, "to prolong, extend" (a truce, agreement, etc.), a sense now obsolete, from Old French proroger, proroguer (14c.) and directly from Latin prorogare, literally "to ask publicly," from pro "before" (see pro-) + rogare "to ask, inquire, question; ask a favor," also "to propose (a law, a candidate);" see rogation. Perhaps the original sense in Latin was "to ask for public assent to extending someone's term in office."

The parliamentary meaning "discontinue temporarily, adjourn until a later time without dissolution" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Prorogued; prorogation.

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renounce (v.)

late 14c., renouncen, "give up (something, especially to another), resign, surrender," from Old French renoncier "give up, cede" (12c., Modern French renoncer) and directly from Latin renuntiare "bring back word; proclaim; protest against, renounce," from re- "against" (see re-) + nuntiare "to report, announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout").

The sense of "abandon, discontinue" (a habit, practice, etc.) is from late 15c.. That of "disclaim relationship with or allegiance to" a person is by c. 1500. That of "to abandon or give up" a belief, opinion, etc. by open recantation, declare against" is from 1530s. Related: Renounced; renouncing; renouncement.

Renounce, to declare strongly, with more or less of formality, that we give up some opinion, profession, or pursuit forever. Thus, a pretender to a throne may renounce his claim. Recant, to make publicly known that we give up a principle or belief formerly maintained, from conviction of its erroneousness ; the word therefore implies the adoption of the opposite belief. [Century Dictionary]
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stop (v.)

Old English -stoppian (in forstoppian "to stop up, stifle"), a general West Germanic word, cognate with Old Saxon stuppon, West Frisian stopje, Middle Low German stoppen, Old High German stopfon, German stopfen "to plug, stop up," Old Low Frankish (be)stuppon "to stop (the ears)."

These words are said by many sources to be a Germanic borrowing of Vulgar Latin *stuppare "to stop or stuff with tow or oakum" (source of Italian stoppare, French étouper "to stop with tow"), from Latin stuppa "coarse part of flax, tow." In support of this theory, it is said that plugs made of tow were used from ancient times in Rhine valley. Century Dictionary says this "suits phonetically," but "is on grounds of meaning somewhat doubtful." Barnhart, for one, proposes the whole Germanic group might be native, from a base *stoppon.

Sense of "bring or come to a halt, discontinue" (mid-15c.) is from notion of preventing a flow by blocking a hole, and the word's development in this sense is unique to English, though it since has been widely adopted in other languages; perhaps influenced by Latin stupere "be stunned, be stupefied." Intransitive meaning "check oneself" is from 1680s. Meaning "make a halt or stay, tarry" is from 1711. Stop-light is from 1922; stop-sign is from 1918. Stop-motion is from 1851, originally of looms. Related: Stopped; stopping.

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leave (v.)

Old English læfan "to allow to remain in the same state or condition; to let remain, allow to survive; to have left (of a deceased person, in reference to heirs, etc.); to bequeath (a heritage)," from Proto-Germanic *laibjanan (source also of Old Frisian leva "to leave," Old Saxon farlebid "left over"), causative of *liban "remain" (source of Old English belifan, German bleiben, Gothic bileiban "to remain"), from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere."

The Germanic root seems to have had only the sense "remain, continue" (which was in Old English as well but has since become obsolete), which also is in Greek lipares "persevering, importunate." But this usually is regarded as a development from the primary PIE sense of "adhere, be sticky" (compare Lithuanian lipti, Old Church Slavonic lipet "to adhere," Greek lipos "grease," Sanskrit rip-/lip- "to smear, adhere to."

Originally a strong verb (past participle lifen), it early switched to a weak form. Meaning "go away, take one's departure, depart from; leave behind" (c. 1200) comes from notion of "leave behind" (as in to leave the earth "to die;" to leave the field "retreat"). From c. 1200 as "to stop, cease; give up, relinquish, abstain from having to do with; discontinue, come to an end;" also "to omit, neglect; to abandon, forsake, desert; divorce;" also "allow (someone) to go."

Colloquial use for "let, allow" is by 1840, said by OED to be chiefly American English. Not related to leave (n.). To leave out "omit" is from late 15c. To leave (something) alone is from c. 1400; to leave (something) be is from 1825. To leave (something/nothing) to be desired is from 1780. To leave it at that is from 1902. Leave off is from c. 1400 as "cease, desist" (transitive); early 15c. as "stop, make an end" (intransitive).

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