Etymology
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No results were found for discompose. Showing results for decompose.
decompose (v.)

1750s, "to separate into components," from de- "opposite of" + compose (v.) in the sense of "make or form by uniting two or more things." Sense of "putrefy, become resolved into constituent elements" is by 1777. Related: Decomposed; decomposing.

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decomposer (n.)

"a decomposing agent," 1821, agent noun from decompose.

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decomposable (adj.)

"capable of being resolved into constituent elements," 1784; see decompose + -able. Related: Decomposability.

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putrefy (v.)

late 14c., putrefien, "to decompose, rot, decay with a fetid smell," from Old French putréfier and directly from Latin putrefacere "to make rotten," from putrere "to stink" (see putrid) + facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Transitive sense of "cause to decompose or rot" is from early 15c. Related: Putrefied; putrefying.

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decay (v.)

late 15c., "to decrease," also "to decline, deteriorate, lose strength or excellence," from Anglo-French decair, Old North French decair (Old French decheoir, 12c., Modern French déchoir) "to fall, set (of the sun), weaken, decline, decay," from Vulgar Latin *decadere "to fall off," from de "off" (see de-) + Latin cadere "to fall" (from PIE root *kad- "to fall").

Transitive sense of "cause to deteriorate, cause to become unsound or impaired" is from 1530s. Sense of "decompose, rot" is from 1570s. Related: Decayed; decaying.

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