Etymology
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disagree (v.)

late 15c., "refuse assent to," from Old French desagreer (12c.), from des- "not, opposite of" (see dis-) + agreer "to please, satisfy; to receive with favor, take pleasure in" (see agree). Sense of "differ in opinion, express contrary views" is from 1550s. Related: Disagreed; disagreeing.

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tor (n.)

"high, rocky hill," Old English torr "rock, crag;" said to be a different word than torr "tower." Obviously cognate with Gaelic torr "lofty hill, mound," Old Welsh twrr "heap, pile;" and perhaps ultimately with Latin turris "high structure" (see tower (n.)). But sources disagree on whether the Celts borrowed it from the Anglo-Saxons or the other way round.

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disaccord (v.)

late 14c., disacorden "be contrary; disagree, refuse assent," from Old French desacorder (12c., Modern French désaccorder), from des- "opposite of" (see dis-) + acorder "agree, be in harmony" (see accord (v.)). Related: Disaccorded; disaccording.

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fork (v.)

early 14c., "to divide in branches, go separate ways," also "disagree, be inconsistent," from fork (n.). Transitive meaning "raise or pitch with a fork" is from 1812. Related: Forked; forking. The slang verb phrase fork (something) over is from 1839 (fork out) "give over" is from 1831). Forking (n.) in the forensic sense "disagreement among witnesses" is from c. 1400.

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disagreement (n.)

late 15c., "refusal to agree or assent," from disagree + -ment. From 1570s as "difference in form or essence," also "difference of opinion or sentiments," perhaps a separate formation from dis- + agreement. From 1580s as "a falling out, contention." As "unsuitableness, unfitness," by 1702.

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dissidence (n.)

"difference or separation in opinion," 1650s, from Latin dissidentia "diversity, contrariety," from dissidens, present participle of dissidere "to be remote; disagree, be removed from," literally "to sit apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."

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discord (v.)
Origin and meaning of discord

c. 1300, discorden, "differ in will or opinion, disagree, quarrel," from Old French discorder (13c.) and directly from Latin discordare "be at variance, differ, quarrel," from discors (genitive discordis) "disagreeing, disagreement," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + cor (genitive cordis) "heart," from PIE root *kerd- "heart."

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repugnance (n.)

early 15c., repugnaunce, "logical contradiction, inconsistency; incompatibility; resistance, opposition"(senses now obsolete), from Old French repugnance "opposition, resistance" (13c.) or directly from Latin repugnantia "incompatibility," from stem of repugnare "resist, disagree, be incompatible," from re- "back" (see re-) + pugnare "to fight" (from PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). The meaning "mental opposition or antagonism, aversion, strong dislike" is from 1640s. Related: Repugnancy.

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differ (v.)
Origin and meaning of differ

late 14c., "be unlike, dissimilar, distinct, or various," from Old French differer (14c.) and directly from Latin differre "to set apart, differ," from assimilated form of dis- "apart, away from" (see dis-) + ferre "to bear, carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry." Meaning "disagree, be of contrary opinion" is from 1560s.

Two senses that were present in Latin have gone separate ways in English in sense and spelling (probably based on different stress) since c. 1500, with defer (transitive) taking one set of meanings and differ (intransitive) the rest. Related: Differed; differing.

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