Etymology
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direction (n.)

late 14c., direccioun, "action of directing or guiding," from Latin directionem (nominative directio) "a making straight, a straight line, a directing (toward something)," noun of action from past-participle stem of dirigere "to set straight, arrange; give a particular direction to," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + regere "to direct, to guide, keep straight" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line").

Meaning "the act of governing, administration" is from early 15c. Sense of "relative position without regard to distance" is from 1660s. Meaning "course pursued by a moving object" is from 1660s.

Sense of "order, instruction in how to proceed" is from early 15c.; specific sense of "instruction in how to get somewhere" is from 1590s (directions in this sense is by 1749). Related: Directional.

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bidirectional (adj.)
also bi-directional, by 1941, from bi- + direction + -al (1). Originally of microphones. Related: Bidirectionally.
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omnidirectional (adj.)

1927, "of equal power in all directions," from omni- "all" + directional (see direction).

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misdirection (n.)

1736, "wrong direction, erroneous guidance," from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + direction. Meaning "action of a conjurer, thief, etc. to distract someone" is from 1943.

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anywhither (adv.)
"in any direction," 1610s, from any + whither.
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offward (adv.)

"in a direction or position away from (something)," c. 1600, from off (prep.) + -ward.

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polarity (n.)

1640s, "the having two opposite poles," originally of magnets, from polar + -ity. The sense of "variation in certain physical properties so that in one direction they are the opposite of what they are in the opposite direction" is from 1670s.

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reorient (v.)

also re-orient, 1897, transitive, "give a new direction to;" 1937, intransitive, "adjust (to), come to terms with, adopt a new direction;" from re- "back, again" + orient (v.) or perhaps a back-formation from reorientation. Related: Reoriented; reorienting. Alternative reorientate is recorded from 1913. Tennyson uses reorient as an adjective, "arising again or anew."

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clockwise (adv.)

also clock-wise, "in the direction of the rotation of the hands of a clock," 1879, from clock (n.1) + wise (n.).

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