Etymology
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digital (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digital

mid-15c., "pertaining to numbers below ten;" 1650s, "pertaining to fingers," from Latin digitalis, from digitus "finger or toe" (see digit). The numerical sense is because numerals under 10 were counted on fingers. Meaning "using numerical digits" is from 1938, especially of computers which run on data in the form of digits (opposed to analogue) after c. 1945. In reference to recording or broadcasting, from 1960.

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carotid (adj.)

1540s, "pertaining to the two great arteries of the neck," from Greek karotidēs "great arteries of the neck," plural of karotis, from karoun "plunge into sleep or stupor," because compression of these arteries was believed to cause unconsciousness (Galen). But if this is folk etymology, the Greek word could be from kara "head," related to kranion "skull, upper part of the head" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head").

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arteriosclerosis (n.)

"hardening of the arteries," 1885, medical Latin, from arterio- + sclerosis.

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DVD 

1995, initialism (acronym) from Digital Video Disc, later changed to Digital Versatile Disc.

Earlier this year, electronics giant Toshiba positioned the first DVD players available in the U.S. as a home entertainment unit (retail price $600). [Black Enterprise magazine, June 1997]
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angioplasty (n.)

procedure used to open blocked arteries, by 1976, from angio- + -plasty.

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angiogram (n.)

"X-ray image of the arteries, veins, and/or heart chambers," 1933, from angio- + -gram.

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MIDI 

"device for connecting computers and electronic musical instruments," 1983, acronym for Musical Instrument Digital Interface.

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P.D.A. 

also PDA, by 1992, initialism (acronym) for personal digital assistant.

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digitalize (v.)
Origin and meaning of digitalize

"convert into a sequence of digits," 1962, from digital + -ize. Related: Digitalized; digitalizing.

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throb (v.)

late 14c., of uncertain origin, perhaps meant to represent in sound the pulsation of arteries and veins or the heart. Related: Throbbed; throbbing. The noun is first attested 1570s.

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