Etymology
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observation (n.)

late 14c., observacioun, "the performance of a religious rite," from Old French observation (c. 1200) and directly from Latin observationem (nominative observatio) "a watching over, observance, investigation," noun of action from past-participle stem of observare "watch over, note, heed, look to, attend to, guard, regard, comply with," from ob "in front of, before" (see ob-) + servare "to watch, keep safe," from PIE root *ser- (1) "to protect." Sense of "act or fact of paying attention" is from 1550s. Meaning "a remark in reference to something observed" is recorded from 1590s.

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detach (v.)

1680s, "unfasten, disunite" (transitive), especially "separate for a special purpose or service," from French détacher "to detach, untie," from Old French destachier, from des- "apart" (see des-) + attachier "attach" (see attach). Related: Detached; detaching.

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staccato (adj.)

1724, from Italian staccato, literally "detached, disconnected," past participle of staccare "to detach," shortened form of distaccare "separate, detach," from French destacher, from Old French destachier "to detach" (see detach). As an adverb from 1844. Related: Staccatissimo.

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detachable (adj.)

"capable of being separated," 1797; see detach + -able. Related: Detachability.

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observational (adj.)

1834, "of or pertaining to (scientific) observation," from observation + -al (1).

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remark (n.)

1650s, "fact of being worthy of comment," also "an act of observation" (a sense now obsolete), from remark (v.). The meaning "a verbal or written notice or comment" is from 1670s; the sense of "observation, notice" also is from 1670s.

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semi-attached (adj.)

"partially or loosely united," by 1860, from semi- + past participle of detach (v.). Compare semi-detached.

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extraspection (n.)

"outward observation," 1887, from extra- + ending from introspection.

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disengage (v.)

c. 1600 in figurative sense "loosen from that which entangles;" 1660s in literal sense of "detach, release from connection," from dis- "do the opposite of" + engage (q.v.). Intransitive sense of "withdraw, become separated" is from 1640s. Related: Disengaged; disengaging.

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secluded (adj.)

c. 1600, of persons, "separated from others, withdrawn from public observation;" 1798, in reference to places, "remote or screened from visibility or access;" past-participle adjective from seclude (v.). Earlier secluse (1590s).

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