Etymology
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dense (adj.)

early 15c., "closely compacted, thick," from Latin densus "thick, crowded; cloudy," which is of uncertain etymology, perhaps related to Greek dasys "hairy, shaggy; thick with leaves," as a grammatical term, "aspirated," but even this is in doubt. Figurative sense of "difficult to penetrate" (of writing, etc.) is from 1732; that of "stupid" is first recorded 1822. Related: Densely; denseness.

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densimeter (n.)

"apparatus for ascertaining the comparative density of a solid or liquid," 1848; see dense + -meter.

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density (n.)

c. 1600, "quality of being very close or compact," from French densité (16c.), from Old French dempsité (13c.), from Latin densitas "thickness," from densus "thick, dense" (see dense). In physics, "the mass of matter per unit of bulk," 1660s.

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condense (v.)

early 15c., "thicken, make more dense or compact" (implied in condensed), from Old French condenser (14c.) or directly from Latin condensare "to make dense," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + densare "make thick," from densus "dense, thick, crowded," a word used of crowds, darkness, clouds, etc. (see dense).

Sense in chemistry and physics, "to reduce to another and denser form" (as a gas or vapor to a liquid) is from 1660s. Intransitive sense "become denser" is from 1650s. Related: Condensed; condensing.

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condensate (v.)

1550s, "to make dense" (a sense now obsolete or rare), from condens-, past-participle stem of Latin condensare "to make dense" (see condense) + -ate (2). Intransitive meaning "to become dense" is from c. 1600.

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pycno- 

before vowels pycn-, word-forming element meaning "close, thick, dense," from Latinized combining form of Greek pyknos "thick, dense, solid, compact; numerous; strong; brave; clever," which is of uncertain origin. Often in English via German as pykno-.

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condensation (n.)

c. 1600, "action or state of making or becoming more dense," from Late Latin condensationem (nominative condensatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin condensare "to make dense" (see condense). Meaning "conversion of a gas or vapor to a liquid form" is from 1610s.

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maquis (n.)

"dense scrub or brushwood in a Mediterranean land," 1858, from French maquis "undergrowth, shrub," especially in reference to the dense scrub of certain Mediterranean coastal regions, long the haunts of outlaws and fugitives, from Corsican Italian macchia "spot," from Latin macula "spot, stain" (see macula). The landscapes were so called from their mottled appearance. Used figuratively of French resistance in World War II (1943). A member is a maquisard.

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condensed (adj.)

c. 1600, "made more dense, compressed, compacted," past-participle adjective from condense. Of literary works, from 1823. Condensed milk is attested by 1863. Condensed type (1854) is thinner than compressed.

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broccoli (n.)

variety of common cabbage with a dense, edible head, 1690s, from Italian broccoli, plural of broccolo "a sprout, cabbage sprout," diminutive of brocco "shoot, protruding tooth, small nail," from Latin broccus (see broach (n.)).

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