Etymology
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denote (v.)

1590s, "mark off from others; identify by a mark; be the sign or symptom of," from French dénoter (14c.), from Latin denotare "denote, mark out," from de- "completely" (see de-) + notare "to mark, note, make a note" (see note (v.)). Related: Denoted; denoting.

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denotative (adj.)

"having power to denote," 1610s, from Latin denotat-, past-participle stem of denotare (see denote) + -ive. Related: Denotatively.

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tantric (adj.)

1905, from tantra + -ic; used loosely in the West to denote erotic spiritualism.

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vee (n.)

1869, to denote the shape of the letter V. As a type of engine, by 1915.

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denotate (v.)

"to denote, signify; to note down, describe," 1590s, a back-formation from denotation, or else from past-participle stem of Latin denotare "denote, mark out," from de- "completely" (see de-) + notare "to mark, note, make a note" (see note (v.)). Related: Denotated; denotating.

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tonne (n.)

1877, French form of ton (n.1), adopted for English use to denote a metric ton (1,000 kg.).

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overcompensation (n.)

also over-compensation, 1917 in the psychological sense, translating German überkompensation, from over- + compensation. A term used by Alfred Alder to denote exaggerated striving for power in those who have an inner sense of inferiority.

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dura mater (n.)

"tough outer membrane surrounding the brain and the spinal cord," c. 1400, from Medieval Latin dura mater cerebri, literally "hard mother of the brain," a loan-translation of Arabic umm al-dimagh as-safiqa, literally "thick mother of the brain." "In Arabic, the words 'father,' 'mother,' and 'son' are often used to denote relationships between things" [Klein].

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plenum (n.)

1670s, "filled space, the fullness of matter in space" (opposite of vacuum), from Latin plenum (spatium) "full (space)," neuter of adjective plenus "full, filled, greatly crowded; stout, pregnant; abundant, abounding; complete," from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill." Used to denote fullness in general, hence the meaning "of a full assembly of legislators" is recorded by 1772.

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id (n.)

1924, in Joan Riviere's translation of Freud's "Das Ich und das Es" (1923), from Latin id "it" (as a translation of German es "it" in Freud's title), used in psychoanalytical theory to denote the unconscious instinctual force. Latin id is from PIE pronominal stem *i- (see yon).

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