Etymology
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delivery (n.)

early 15c., "act of setting free from bondage," also "action of handing over to another," from Anglo-French delivrée, noun use of fem. past participle of Old French delivrer (see deliver). Sense of "childbirth, giving forth of offspring" is by 1570s; that of "manner of utterance or enunciation" is from 1660s. Of a blow, throw of a ball, etc., "act of sending or putting forth," from 1702. The hospital's childbirth delivery room is attested by 1849 (in early use often in a German context, translating Kreisszimmer).

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deliverance (n.)

c. 1300, deliveraunce, "action of setting free" in physical or spiritual senses, from Old French delivrance (12c., Modern French délivrance), from delivrer "to set free" (see deliver). Formerly also with senses now restricted to delivery: "childbirth; act of giving or transferring to another; utterance."

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C.O.D. 
abbreviation of cash on delivery, 1859, originally American English.
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futures (n.)
"goods sold on agreement for future delivery," 1880, from future (n.) in a financial sense "speculative purchase or sale of stock or other commodities for future delivery."
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craniotomy (n.)

a cutting open of the skull (especially of a fetal head when it obstructs delivery), 1817, from cranio- "of the skull" + -tomy "a cutting."

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RFD 
also R.F.D.; 1882, American English, it stands for rural free delivery.
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accouchement (n.)
"parturition, delivery in childbed," 1803, from French accouchement, noun of action from accoucher "go to childbed" (see accoucheur). The verb accouche (1867) is a back-formation, or else from French accoucher.
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miscarriage (n.)

1580s, "mistake, error, a going wrong;" 1610s, "misbehavior, wrong or perverse course of conduct;" see miscarry + -age. In pathology, the meaning "untimely delivery" is from 1660s, on the notion of "fail to reach the intended result." Miscarriage of justice is from 1875, from the "going wrong" sense.

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screwball (n.)

"eccentric person," 1933, U.S. slang, earlier as a type of erratic baseball pitch (1928), from a still earlier name for a type of delivery in cricket (1866), from screw (n.) + ball (n.1). Screwball comedy is attested from 1937, in reference to the work of Carole Lombard.

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spin (n.)
1831, "a rapid revolving motion," from spin (v.). Meaning "fairly rapid ride" is from 1856. Sense of "a twisting delivery in throwing or striking a ball" is from 1851. Sense in physics is from 1926. Meaning "act of playing a phonograph record" is from 1977. Meaning "influence imparted by a media source" is from 1984.
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