Etymology
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deliverance (n.)

c. 1300, deliveraunce, "action of setting free" in physical or spiritual senses, from Old French delivrance (12c., Modern French délivrance), from delivrer "to set free" (see deliver). Formerly also with senses now restricted to delivery: "childbirth; act of giving or transferring to another; utterance."

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deprecate (v.)

1620s, "to pray against or for deliverance from, pray the removal or deliverance from," from Latin deprecatus, past participle of deprecari "to pray (something) away," from de "away" (see de-) + precari "to pray" (from PIE root *prek- "to ask, entreat"). Meaning "to express disapproval, urge against" is from 1640s. Related: Deprecated, deprecating.

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Isaiah 
masc. proper name, name of a biblical prophet and of the book credited to him, from Hebrew Yesha'yah, abbreviated form of Yesha'yahu, literally "salvation of the Lord," from yesha, yeshua "salvation, deliverance." Related: Isaian
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sublimation (n.)
late 14c., in alchemy, "process of purifying by vaporizing then allowing to cool," from Medieval Latin sublimationem (nominative sublimatio) "refinement," literally "a lifting up, deliverance," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin sublimare "to raise, elevate," from sublimis "lofty, high, exalted; eminent, distinguished" (see sublime).
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hosanna (interj.)
Old English osanna, via Medieval Latin hosanna, Late Latin osanna, and Greek ossana, hosanna, from Hebrew hosha'na, probably a shortening of hoshi'ah-nna "save, we pray" (see Psalms cxviii.25), from imperative of y-sh- (compare yeshua "salvation, deliverance, welfare," for which see Joshua) + emphatic particle -na. Originally an appeal for deliverance; used in Christian Church as an ascription of praise, because when Jesus entered Jerusalem this was shouted by Galilean pilgrims in recognition of his messiahhood (Matthew xxi.9, 15, etc.).
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riddance (n.)

1530s, "a cleaning out, removal, clearance," from rid + -ance. The meaning "a deliverance from something superfluous or unwanted" is from 1590s. Good riddance, "a welcome relief from unpleasant company or an embarrassing connection" attested from 1650s. Shakespeare has gentle riddance (1590s); Middleton has fair riddance (1610s).

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redemption (n.)

mid-14c., redemcioun, "deliverance from sin," from Old French redemcion (12c.) and directly from Latin redemptionem (nominative redemptio) "a buying back or off, a releasing, a ransoming" (also "bribery"), noun of action from past-participle stem of redimere "to redeem, buy back," from red- "back" (see re-) + emere "to take, buy, gain, procure" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute").

The -d- is from the Old Latin habit of using red- as the form of re- before vowels, as also preserved in redact, redolent, redundant. The general sense of "release, repurchase, deliverance" is from late 15c. Commercial sense is from late 15c. Year of Redemption as "Anno Domini" is from 1510s. In the Mercian hymns, Latin redemptionem is glossed by Old English alesnisse.

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deprecative (adj.)

mid-15c., "praying for deliverance from evil," from Old French deprecatif (13c.) and directly from Late Latin deprecativus, from deprecat-, past-participle stem of Latin deprecari "plead in excuse, avert by prayer," literally "to pray (something) away," from de "away" (see de-) + precari "to pray" (from PIE root *prek- "to ask, entreat").  Related: Deprecatively.

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deprecation (n.)

c. 1500, deprecacioun, "prayer to avert evil, earnest desire for exemption or deliverance," from Old French deprecation and directly from Latin deprecationem (nominative deprecatio) "a warding off or averting by prayer," noun of action from past-participle stem of deprecari "plead in excuse; avert by prayer," literally "to pray (something) away," from de "away" (see de-) + precari "to pray" (from PIE root *prek- "to ask, entreat"). Sense of "disapproval, earnest expression of feeling against" is by 1610s.

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paean (n.)

"hymn of praise, song of triumph;" in general use, "a loud and joyous song," 1590s, from Latin paean "hymn of deliverance, hymn to a help-giving god," from Greek paian "hymn, chant, hymn to Apollo," from Paian, Paiōn, a name of the god of healing; originally the physician of the gods (in Homer), later merged with Apollo; literally "one who touches" (i.e. "one who heals by a touch"), probably taken from a phrase or word at the beginning of the hymn, from paio "to touch, strike." The notion seems to be either a cry asking for aid in war or other trouble, or a giving thanks for aid received.

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