Etymology
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deliver (v.)

c. 1200, deliveren, "save, rescue, set free, liberate," from Old French delivrer "to set free; remove; save, preserve; hand over (goods)," also used of childbirth, from Late Latin deliberare, from de "away" (see de-) + Latin liberare "to free," from liber "free, unrestricted, unimpeded" (see liberal (adj.)).

The sense of "to bring (a woman) to childbirth," in English is from c. 1300. Sense of "hand over, give, give up, yield" is from c. 1300 in English, which is in opposition to its etymological sense. Meaning "to project, cast, strike, throw" is from c. 1400. Related: Delivered; delivering.

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deliverable (adj.)

"that may be delivered," 1727, from deliver + -able.

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undelivered (adj.)
late 15c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of deliver (v.).
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deliverance (n.)

c. 1300, deliveraunce, "action of setting free" in physical or spiritual senses, from Old French delivrance (12c., Modern French délivrance), from delivrer "to set free" (see deliver). Formerly also with senses now restricted to delivery: "childbirth; act of giving or transferring to another; utterance."

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delivery (n.)

early 15c., "act of setting free from bondage," also "action of handing over to another," from Anglo-French delivrée, noun use of fem. past participle of Old French delivrer (see deliver). Sense of "childbirth, giving forth of offspring" is by 1570s; that of "manner of utterance or enunciation" is from 1660s. Of a blow, throw of a ball, etc., "act of sending or putting forth," from 1702. The hospital's childbirth delivery room is attested by 1849 (in early use often in a German context, translating Kreisszimmer).

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harangue (v.)

"to address in a harangue; to deliver a harangue," 1650s, from French haranguer (15c.), from harangue (see harangue (n.)). Related: Harangued; haranguing.

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extradite (v.)

"to deliver or give up, as to another nation," 1864, back-formation from extradition. Related: Extradited; extraditing; extraditable.

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slug (v.)
"deliver a hard blow with the fist," 1862, from slug (n.3). Related: Slugged; slugging. Slugging-match is from 1878.
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lecture (v.)
1580s, "to read or deliver formal discourses," from lecture (n.). Transitive sense "instruct by oral discourse" is from 1680s. Meaning "to address severely and at length" is from 1706. Related: Lectured; lecturing.
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disenchant (v.)

"free from enchantment, deliver from the power of charms or spells," 1580s, from French desenchanter (13c.), from des- (see dis-) + enchanter "to enchant," from Latin incantare "to enchant, fix a spell upon" (see enchant). Related: Disenchanted; disenchanting. Carlyle coined disenchantress (1831).

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