Etymology
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deliberative (adj.)

1550s, "pertaining to deliberation," from French délibératif or directly from Latin deliberativus "pertaining to deliberation," from past-participle stem of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra). Meaning "characterized by deliberation" is by 1650s. Related: Deliberatively; deliberativeness.

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resolve (n.)

"determination, firmness or fixedness of purpose; a determination," 1590s, from resolve (v.).  Meaning "a determination of a deliberative body" is from 1650s.

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investigative (adj.)

"of or pertaining to investigation, curious and deliberative in research," 1803, from Latin investigat-, past-participle stem of investigare (see investigation) + -ive. Journalism sense is from 1951.

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sederunt (n.)

"a sitting, a session" of a deliberative or judicial body, 1620s, Latin, literally "there sat" (the typical opening word in records written in Latin of such proceedings, noting the members present), third person plural past tense of sedere "to sit" (from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit").

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Reichstag (n.)

1867 as the name of parliaments in central European nations, especially "the German imperial parliament" (1871-1918), from German Reichstag, from Reich "state, realm" (see Reich) + Tag "assembly," literally "day" (see day).

Earliest use in English is in reference to the chief deliberative body of the North German Confederacy. Also later as the name of the building (opened in 1894) in Berlin in which the imperial parliament met; hence Reichstag Fire (which took place Feb. 27, 1933) as symbolic of a disruptive act engineered to facilitate the rise of a party to power.

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move (v.)

late 13c., meven, in various senses (see below), from Anglo-French mover, Old French movoir "to move, get moving, set out; set in motion; introduce" (Modern French mouvoir), from Latin movere "move, set in motion; remove; disturb" (past participle motus, frequentative motare), from PIE root *meue- "to push away."

Of the physical meanings, the earliest in English (late 13c.) is the intransitive one of "change one's place or posture, stir, shift; move the body; move from one's place, change position. That of "to go (from one place to another), journey, travel; set out, proceed" is from c. 1300. The transitive sense of "cause to change place or position; shift; dislodge; set in motion" is from late 14c., as is that of "impart motion to, impel; set or sustain in motion." The intransitive sense of "pass from place to place; journey; travel; change position continuously or occasionally" is from c. 1300.

The emotional, figurative, and non-material senses also are mostly from Middle English: The earliest is "excite to action; influence; induce; incite; arouse; awaken" the senses or mental faculties or emotions (late 13c.); specifically "affect (someone) emotionally, rouse to pity or tenderness" by early 14c. Hence also "influence (someone, to do something), guide, prompt or impel toward some action" (late 14c.).

The sense of "propose; bring forward; offer formally; submit," as a motion for consideration by a deliberative assembly" is by early 15c. Sense of "to change one's place of residence" is from 1707. In chess, checkers, and similar games, "to change the position of a piece in the course of play," late 15c. Commercial sense of "sell, cause to be sold" is by 1900.

The policeman's order to move on is attested by 1831. To move heaven and earth "make extraordinary efforts" is by 1798. Related: Moved;moving.

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