Etymology
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delete (v.)

"destroy, eradicate," 1530s, from Latin deletus, past participle of delere "destroy, blot out, efface," from delevi, originally perfective tense of delinere "to daub, erase by smudging" (as of the wax on a writing table), from de "from, away" (see de-) + linere "to smear, wipe," from PIE root *(s)lei- "slime, slimy, sticky" (see slime (n.)). In English, specifically in reference to written matter from c. 1600. Related: Deleted; deleting.

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deletion (n.)

1580s, "a word or passage deleted;" c. 1600. "act of blotting out or erasing," from Latin deletionem (nominative deletio), noun of action from past-participle stem of delere "destroy, blot out, efface" (see delete).

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indelible (adj.)

1520s, from Latin indelebilis "indelible, imperishable," from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + delebilis "able to be destroyed," from delere "destroy, blot out" (see delete). Vowel change from -e- to -i- in English is late 17c. Related: Indelibly.

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dele (v.)

"take out, remove," typographer's direction to remove a letter, 1727, ultimately from Latin delere "destroy, blot out, efface" (see delete), perhaps via dele, imperative singular, or deleatur "let it be deleted," third person singular present passive subjunctive (which itself was used in English from c. 1600). Usually expressed by a distinctive script form of "d".

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subduce (v.)

mid-15c., "to delete;" 1540s, "to withdraw oneself" (from a place, allegiance, etc.), from Latin subducere "to draw away, withdraw, remove," from sub "under, below" (see sub-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Related: Subduced; subducing.

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