Etymology
Advertisement
deformed (adj.)

"marred in shape, distorted," c. 1400, past-participle adjective from deform (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
deform (v.)
Origin and meaning of deform

c. 1400, deformen, difformen, "to disfigure, mar the natural form or shape of," from Old French deformer (13c.) and directly from Latin deformare "put out of shape, disfigure," from de (see de-) + formare "to shape, fashion, build," also figurative, from forma "form, contour, figure, shape" (see form (n.)). Related: Deformed; deforming.

Related entries & more 
club-foot (n.)

also clubfoot, "deformed foot," 1530s, from club (n.) + foot (n.). Related: Club-footed.

Related entries & more 
Mystic 
place name in Connecticut, U.S., deformed from Algonquian missituk "great tidal river," from missi "large" + -tuk "tidal river."
Related entries & more 
Spanglish (n.)
"Spanish deformed by English words and idioms," by 1967, probably a nativization of Spanish Espanglish (1954); ultimately from Spanish (n.) + English.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
talipes (n.)
"club-foot, deformed foot," from Latin talus "ankle" (see talus (n.1)) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). The notion seems to be "walking on the ankles."
Related entries & more 
letch (n.)
"craving, longing, strong desire," 1796 [Grose], perhaps a back-formation from lecher, or deformed from a figurative use of latch (v.) in a secondary sense of "grasp, grasp on to." Or perhaps from letch (v.), a variant of leach.
Related entries & more 
Tijuana 
from the name of a Diegueño (Yuman) village, written Tiajuan in 1829; deformed by folk-etymology association with Spanish Tia Juana "Aunt Jane."
Related entries & more 
misshapen (adj.)

"having a bad or ugly shape, crippled, deformed, monstrous," also "degraded, perverted," late 14c., from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + old alternative past participle of shape (v.). The verb misshape (1520s) is perhaps a back-formation.

Related entries & more 
moon-calf (n.)

also mooncalf, "abortive, shapeless, fleshy mass," 1560s, attributed to the influence of the moon; from moon (n.) + calf (n.1). In later 16c., "deformed creature, monster;" from 1620s as "congenital idiot."

Related entries & more