Etymology
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decoration (n.)

early 15c., decoracioun, "the covering of blemishes with cosmetics;" 1580s, "action of adorning with something becoming or ornamental," from Medieval Latin decorationem (nominative decoratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin decorare "to decorate, adorn, embellish, beautify," from decus (genitive decoris) "an ornament; grace, dignity, honor," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept" (on the notion of "to add grace"),

Meaning "that which decorates" is from 1670s. As "a badge or medal worn as a mark of honor" (often in plural, decorations), also "the conferring of a badge or medal of honor," by 1816. In U.S., Decoration Day (by 1870) was another old name for Memorial Day (q.v.), when the graves of the Civil War dead from the North were decorated with flowers.

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gaudery (n.)
"showy decoration," 1590s, from gaud (n.) + -ery.
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adornment (n.)
late 14c., "act of adorning;" also "a thing which adorns;" from Old French aornement "ornament, decoration," from aorner (see adorn).
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decorator (n.)

"one whose business is the decoration of dwellings or public edifices," 1700, agent noun in Latin form from decorate.

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geometric (adj.)
1620s, "pertaining to geometry," shortened form of geometrical (q.v.). In reference to a style of ancient Greek pottery decoration characterized by straight lines and angles, and the associated culture, 1902.
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decoupage (n.)

"decoration of a surface with an applied paper cut-out," by 1957, from French découpage, literally "the act of cutting out," from decouper "to cut out" (12c., Old French decoper), from dé- "out" (see de-) + couper "to cut" (see chop (v.1)).

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garnishment (n.)
1550s, "embellishment, adornment, decoration," from garnish (v.) + -ment. Legal financial sense from 17c. The verbal noun garnishing also was used in the sense "ornament, that which decorates" (late 14c.).
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scenery (n.)

"decoration of a theater stage, disposition and succession of scenes in a play," 1770 (in a figurative sense), earlier scenary; see scene + -ery. Meaning "a landscape or view, general appearance of a place considered as a pictorial scene" is from 1777.

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Silver Star 
U.S. military decoration awarded for gallantry in action, originally (1918) a small badge worn on the ribbon of a campaign medal; as a distinct medal, it was established Aug. 8, 1932.
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gingerbread (n.)
late 13c., gingerbrar, "preserved ginger," from Old French ginginbrat "ginger preserve," from Medieval Latin gingimbratus "gingered," from gingiber (see ginger). The ending changed by folk etymology to -brede "bread," a formation attested by mid-14c. Meaning "sweet cake spiced with ginger" is from 15c. Figurative use, indicating anything considered showy and insubstantial, is from c. 1600. Sense of "fussy decoration on a house" is first recorded 1757; gingerbread-work (1748) was a sailor's term for carved decoration on a ship. Gingerbread-man as a confection is from 1850; the rhyme ("The Chase of the Gingerbread Man," by Ella M. White) is from 1898.
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