Etymology
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decide (v.)

late 14c., "to settle a dispute, determine a controversy," from Old French decider, from Latin decidere "to decide, determine," literally "to cut off," from de "off" (see de-) + caedere "to cut" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). For Latin vowel change, see acquisition. Sense is of resolving difficulties "at a stroke." Meaning "to make up one's mind" is attested from 1830. Related: Decided; deciding.

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undecided (adj.)
1530s, "not decided, unsettled," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of decide (v.).
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decisive (adj.)

1610s, "having the quality or power of determining," from Medieval Latin decisivus, from Latin decis-, past participle stem of decidere "to cut off; decide" (see decide). Meaning "marked by prompt determination" is from 1736. Compare decided. Related: Decisively; decisiveness.

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decided (adj.)

"resolute, free from hesitation or wavering," 1790, past-participle adjective from decide. A decided victory is one the reality of which is not in doubt; a decisive one goes far toward settling some issue. Meaning "free from ambiguity or uncertainty" also is from 1790. Related: Decidedly.

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*kae-id- 

*kaə-id-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to strike."

It forms all or part of: abscise; avicide; biocide; caesarian; caesura; cement; chisel; -cide; circumcise; circumcision; concise; decide; decision; deicide; excise (v.); excision; felicide; feticide; filicide; floricide; fratricide; fungicide; gallinicide; genocide; germicide; herbicide; homicide; incise; incision; incisor; infanticide; insecticide; legicide; liberticide; libricide; matricide; parricide; patricide; pesticide; precise; precision; prolicide; scissors; senicide; spermicide; suicide; uxoricide; verbicide.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit skhidati "beats, tears;" Latin caedere "to strike down, fell, slay;" Lithuanian kaišti "shave;" Armenian xait'em "to stab;" Albanian qeth "to shave;" Middle Dutch heien "to drive piles," Old High German heia "wooden hammer," German heien "beat."

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award (v.)
late 14c., "decide after careful observation," from Anglo-French awarder, from Old North French eswarder (Old French esgarder) "decide, judge, give one's opinion" (after careful consideration), from es- "out" (see ex-) + warder "to watch," a word from Germanic (see ward (n.)). Related: Awarded; awarding.
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scruple (v.)

"to have or make scruples, be reluctant to act or decide, have conscientious doubts," 1620s, from scruple (n.). Related: Scrupled; scrupling.

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prejudge (v.)

1560s, "to prejudice;" 1570s, "to judge beforehand," from French préjuger (16c.), equivalent to Latin praejudicare "to judge or decide beforehand;" see pre- + judge (v.). Related: Prejudged; prejudging; prejudgment.

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arbitrate (v.)
1580s, "act as an umpire, mediate, decide, determine, give an authoritative decision," from Latin arbitratus, past participle of arbitrari "be of an opinion, give a decision," from arbiter "a judge, umpire, mediator" (see arbiter). Meaning "act as an arbitrator" is from 1610s. Related: Arbitrated; arbitrating; arbitrable (1530s). The earlier verb form was arbitren "decide a dispute by arbitration" (early 15c.).
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terminer (n.)
"a determining," legal term, from French terminer "to end," in Old French "to decide, rule on," from Latin terminare "to mark the end or boundary," from terminus "end, limit" (see terminus; also see oyer).
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