Etymology
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deceive (v.)

"mislead by false appearance or statement," c. 1300, from Old French decevoir "to deceive" (12c., Modern French décevoir), from Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de "from" or pejorative (see de-) + combining form of capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Deceived; deceiver; deceiving.

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undeceived (adj.)

c. 1400, "reliable, accurate, certain," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of deceive (v.). Sense of "freed from deception or false belief" is by 1590s, from undeceive (v.).

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undeceive (v.)

"to free from deception or false belief," 1590s, from un- (2) "opposite of" + deceive (v.). Related: Undeceived; undeceiving.

We are only undeceived
Of that which, deceiving, could no longer harm. 

[Eliot, "East Coker"]
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*kap- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to grasp."

It forms all or part of: accept; anticipate; anticipation; behave; behoof; behoove; cable; cacciatore; caitiff; capable; capacious; capacity; capias; capiche; capstan; caption; captious; captivate; captive; captor; capture; case (n.2) "receptacle;" catch; catchpoll; cater; chase (n.1) "a hunt;" chase (v.) "to run after, hunt;" chasse; chasseur; conceive; cop (v.) "to seize, catch;" copper (n.2) "policeman;" deceive; emancipate; except; forceps; gaffe; haft; have; hawk (n.); heave; heavy; heft; incapacity; inception; incipient; intercept; intussusception; manciple; municipal; occupy; participation; perceive; precept; prince; purchase; receive; recipe; recover; recuperate; sashay; susceptible.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kapati "two handfuls;" Greek kaptein "to swallow, gulp down," kope "oar, handle;" Latin capax "able to hold much, broad," capistrum "halter," capere "to grasp, lay hold; be large enough for; comprehend;" Lettish kampiu "seize;" Old Irish cacht "servant-girl," literally "captive;" Welsh caeth "captive, slave;" Gothic haban "have, hold;" Old English hæft "handle," habban "to have, hold."

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bona fides (n.)

"good faith, fair dealing, freedom from intent to deceive," by 1838, English pluralization of bona fide, as though the Latin phrase were a noun. The sense of "guarantees of good faith" is by 1944. The opposite is mala fides "bad faith, intent to deceive."

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flam (n.)

1630s, "sham story, fabrication," also as a verb, "to deceive by flattery;" see flim-flam.

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delusory (adj.)

late 15c., "false, deceitful," from Latin delusor "a deceiver," from stem of deludere "to play false, mock, deceive" (see delude).

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spoof (v.)

1889, "to hoax, deceive, trick;" from 1914 as "to parody or satirize;" see spoof (n.). Related: Spoofed; spoofing.

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sucker (v.)

"to deceive, to make a dupe of," 1939, from sucker (n.) in the related sense. Related: Suckered; suckering.

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trompe l'oeil 

1889, French, literally "deceives the eye," from tromper "to deceive," a verb of uncertain origin and the subject of many theories (see trump (v.2)).

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