Etymology
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death (n.)

Old English deaþ "total cessation of life, act or fact of dying, state of being dead; cause of death," in plural, "ghosts," from Proto-Germanic *dauthuz (source also of Old Saxon doth, Old Frisian dath, Dutch dood, Old High German tod, German Tod, Old Norse dauði, Danish død, Swedish död, Gothic dauus "death"), from verbal stem *dau-, which is perhaps from PIE root *dheu- (3) "to die" (see die (v.)). With Proto-Germanic *-thuz suffix indicating "act, process, condition."

I would not that death should take me asleep. I would not have him meerly seise me, and onely declare me to be dead, but win me, and overcome me. When I must shipwrack, I would do it in a sea, where mine impotencie might have some excuse; not in a sullen weedy lake, where I could not have so much as exercise for my swimming. [John Donne, letter to Sir Henry Goodere, Sept. 1608]

Of inanimate things, "cessation, end," late 14c. From late 12c. as "death personified, a skeleton as the figure of mortality." As "a plague, a great mortality," late 14c. (in reference to the first outbreak of bubonic plague; compare Black Death). Death's-head, a symbol of mortality, is from 1590s. Death's door "the near approach of death" is from 1540s.

As a verbal intensifier "to death, mortally" (as in hate (something) to death) 1610s; earlier to dead (early 14c.). Slang be death on "be very good at" is from 1839. To be the death of "be the cause or occasion of death" is in Shakespeare (1596). Expression a fate worse than death is from 1810 though the idea is ancient.

Death row "part of a prison exclusively for those condemned to capital execution" is by 1912. Death knell is attested from 1814; death penalty "capital punishment" is from 1844; death rate from 1859. Death-throes "struggle which in some cases accompanies death" is from c. 1300.

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death-rattle (n.)

"sound sometimes heard in the last labored breathing of a dying person," 1805, from death + rattle (n.).

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death-wish (n.)

"conscious or unconscious desire for death for oneself or for another," 1896, from death + wish (n.).

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death-trap (n.)

"structure or situation involving imminent risk of death," 1835, from death + trap (n.).

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death-bed (n.)

also deathbed, Old English, "the grave," from death (n.) + bed (n.). Meaning "bed on which someone dies" is from c. 1300.

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death-warrant (n.)

1690s, "warrant of capital execution from proper authority," from death + warrant (n.). Figurative sense of "anything which puts an end to hope or expectation" is from 1874.

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death-watch (n.)

"a vigil beside a dying person," 1865, from death + watch (n.) "a watching." The death-watch beetle (1660s) inhabits houses, makes a ticking noise like a pocket-watch, and was superstitiously supposed to portend death.

FEW ears have escaped the noise of the death-watch, that is, the little clicking sound heard often in many rooms, somewhat resembling that of a watch; and this is conceived to be of an evil omen or prediction of some person's death: wherein notwithstanding there is nothing of rational presage or just cause of terror unto melancholy and meticulous heads. For this noise is made by a little sheathwinged grey insect, found often in wainscot benches and wood-work in the summer. [Browne, "Vulgar Errors"] 
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def (adj.)
"excellent," first recorded 1979 in African-American vernacular, perhaps a shortened form of definite, or from a Jamaican variant of death.
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deathless (adj.)

"not subject to death or destruction, immortal," 1580s, from death + -less. Related: Deathlessly; deathlessness.

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deathly (adj.)

Old English deaþlic "mortal, subject to death" (a sense now obsolete); see death + -ly (1). Meaning "deadly" (of poison, sin, etc.) is from c. 1200; that of "death-like, characteristic of death, resembling death" is from c. 1200, originally of complexion. Compare deadly. Related: Deadliness.

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