Etymology
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David 

masc. proper name, in Old Testament name of the second king of Israel and Judah and author of psalms, from Hebrew Dawidh, literally "darling, beloved friend." The name was common in England and Scotland by 12c. but was popular much earlier in Wales. A nickname form was Dawe, hence surnames Dawson, Dawkins. A top 10 name for boys born in the U.S. from 1934 to 1992. Related: Davidic; Davidian.

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Camp David 
U.S. presidential retreat near Thurmont, Maryland, built 1939 as Hi-Catoctin, in reference to the name of the mountains around it; called Shangri-La by F.D. Roosevelt, after the mythical hard-to-get-to land in the novel "Lost Horizon;" named Camp David by Eisenhower in 1953 for his grandson, born 1947. The Camp David Accords were signed there Sept. 17, 1978.
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Mogen David 

"star of David," six-pointed star, symbol of Judaism or Zionism, 1904, from Hebrew maghen Dawidh "shield of David," king of Judah and Israel, who died c. 973 B.C.E.

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Zion 
late Old English Sion, from Greek Seon, from Hebrew Tsiyon, name of a Canaanite hill fortress in Jerusalem captured by David and called in the Bible "City of David." It became the center of Jewish life and worship.
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Taffy 
characteristic name of a Welshman, c. 1700, from Teifi, Welsh form of Davy (see David).
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Bathsheba 
Biblical wife of King David, mother of Solomon, from Hebrew Bathshebha, literally "daughter of the oath," from bath "daughter."
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davit (n.)

also david, "crane-like structure on the side or stern of a vessel for suspending or lowering a boat," late 14c., daviot, apparently a use of the masc. proper name David on the pattern of applying common Christian names to useful devices (compare jack, jenny, jimmy).

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Seven Champions (n.)
1590s, the national saints of England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, France, Spain, and Italy, viz. George, Andrew, David, Patrick, Denys, James, and Anthony.
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Roscius (n.)

as a generic name or designation for a great actor, 1640s, from Quintus Roscius Gallus (d. 62 B.C.E.), the celebrated Roman actor. Since 19c., mostly (if at all), historical and in reference to David Garrick.

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goliath (n.)
"a giant," 1590s, from Late Latin Goliath, from Hebrew Golyath, name of the Philistine giant slain by David (I Samuel xvii). As a type of beetle from 1826.
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