Etymology
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darken (v.)

c. 1300, derken, "to make dark or darker, deprive of light;" early 14c. (intransitive), "to grow or become dark," from dark (adj.) + -en (1). The more usual verb in Middle English in both senses was simply dark, as it is in Chaucer and Shakespeare, and darken did not predominate until 17c. The Anglo-Saxons also had a verb sweorcan meaning "to grow dark."

Meanings "grow less white or clear, turn a darker color" and "render less white or clear" are from late 14c. Figurative sense of "render gloomy, sadden" is from 1742. To darken(one's) door (usually with a negative) "enter one's house as a visitor," usually with an implication of unwelcomeness, is attested from 1729.

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darkener (n.)

"one who or that which darkens," 1610s, agent noun from darken (v.).

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-en (1)

word-forming element making verbs (such as darken, weaken) from adjectives or nouns, from Old English -nian, from Proto-Germanic *-inojan (also source of Old Norse -na), from PIE adjectival suffix *-no-. Most active in Middle English and early modern English, hence most verbs in -en are comparatively recent.

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obfuscate (v.)

"to darken, obscure, confuse, bewilder," 1530s, from Latin obfuscatus, past participle of obfuscare "to darken" (usually in a figurative sense), from ob "in front of, before" (see ob-) + fuscare "to make dark," from fuscus "dark" (see dusk). Related: Obfuscated; obfuscating.

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bedim (v.)

"make dim, obscure, darken," 1560s, from be- + dim. Related: Bedimmed; bedimming.

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kohl (n.)

"powder used to darken the eyelids, etc.," properly of finely ground antimony, 1799, from Arabic kuhl (see alcohol).

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obscuration (n.)

1540s, "act of darkening; state of being made dark," from Latin obscurationem (nominative obscuratio) "a darkening, obscuring," noun of action from past-participle stem of obscurare "to make dark, darken, obscure," from obscurus (see obscure (adj.) ). 

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obfuscation (n.)

"the act of obscuring," early 15c., obfuscacioun, originally medical, "the darkening of a sore," from Latin obfuscationem (nominative obfuscatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of obfuscare "to darken" (see obfuscate).

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cloud (v.)

early 15c., "overspread with clouds, cover, darken," from cloud (n.). From 1510s as "to render dim or obscure;" 1590s as "to overspread with gloom." Intransitive sense of "become cloudy" is from 1560s. Related: Clouded; clouding.

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blacken (v.)

c. 1200, "become black or dark;" early 14c., "make black, darken, dye (hair);" see black (adj.) + -en (1). The figurative sense of "to besmirch" (with dishonor, etc.) is from early 15c. Related: Blackened; blackening.

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