Etymology
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product (n.)

early 15c., "mathematical quantity obtained by multiplication," from Medieval Latin productum, in classical Latin "something produced," noun use of neuter past participle of producere "bring forth" (see produce (v.)). General sense of "anything produced" is attested in English from 1570s; political economy sense of "what is produced commercially for sale" is by 1890.

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dairy (n.)
Origin and meaning of dairy

c. 1300, daerie, "building for making butter and cheese; dairy farm," formed with Anglo-French -erie (from Latin -arius; see -ery) affixed to Middle English daie (in daie maid "dairymaid"), which is from Old English dæge "kneader of bread, housekeeper, female servant" (see dey (n.1)). The pure native word was dey-house (mid-14c.). Meaning "branch of farming concerned with the production of milk, butter, and cheese" is from 1670s. Later also "shop where milk, butter, etc. are sold."

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by-product (n.)
also byproduct, "secondary or additional product;" 1849, from by + product.
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milkmaid (n.)

"woman who milks cows or is employed in a dairy," 1550s, from milk (n.) + maid.

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GNP (n.)
abbreviation of gross national product, attested by 1953.
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flip-top (adj.)
1955, of product packaging, from flip (v.) + top (n.1).
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commodify (v.)

"to convert into a (mere) commercial product or activity," 1971, back-formation from commodification. Related: Commodified; commodifying.

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one-off (n.)

"single example of a manufactured product," by 1927, from one + off. Later given figurative extension.

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additive (n.)
"something that is added" to a chemical solution or food product, 1945, from additive (adj.).
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distillate (n.)

"product of distillation, a fluid found in the receiver of a distilling apparatus," 1845; see distill + -ate (1).

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