Etymology
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daddy (n.)

c. 1500, colloquial diminutive of dad, with -y (3). Slang daddy-o is attested by 1949, from bop talk.

Daddy-long-legs is from 1814 in Britain as "crane-fly," a slender, long-legged summer fly. In the U.S., it was used by 1865 as the word for a spider-like arachnid with a small round body and very long, slender legs.

A superstition obtains among our cow-boys that if a cow be lost, its whereabouts may be learned by inquiring of the Daddy-Long-legs (Phalangium), which points out the direction of the lost animal with one of its fore legs. [Frank Cowan, "Curious Facts in the History of Insects, Including Spiders and Scorpions," Philadelphia, 1865]
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sugar daddy (n.)
also sugar-daddy, "elderly man who lavishes gifts on a young woman" [OED], 1926, from sugar + daddy.
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Nobodaddy (n.)

c. 1793, William Blake's derisive name for the anthropomorphic God of Christianity. The name reflects nobody + daddy.

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rat fink (n.)
also ratfink, 1963, teen slang, see rat (n.) + fink (n.). Popularized by, and perhaps coined by, U.S. custom car builder Ed "Big Daddy" Roth (1932-2001), who made a hot-rod comic character of it, supposedly to lampoon Mickey Mouse.
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papa (n.)

"father," 1680s, from French papa, from Latin papa, originally a reduplicated child's word, similar to Greek pappa (vocative) "o father," pappas "father," pappos "grandfather." The native word is daddy; according to OED the first use of papa was in courtly speech, as a continental affectation, and it was not used by common folk until late 18c.

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spaz (n.)

also spazz, by 1959, U.S. teen slang phrase, typically in later use a put-down, apparently a derogatory shortening of spastic (n.). Also used as a verb, by 1972, often with out (adv.). Related: Spazzed; spazzing.

My Daddy is a regular spaz. You don't know what a spaz is? Let me tell you. A spaz is a guy who's completely out of this world—but I mean, completely. [Parade Magazine, March 1, 1959]
[Y]our teen-aged daughter asks what you think of her "shades," which you are canny enough to know are her sunglasses, and you say, "cool," and she says, "oh dad, what a spaz!" [Russell Baker column, April 13, 1965]
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